Revo

Behind The Bins

Registered User
Only 33 once ha
Only 50 once boo, but have to say dont care about warranty. Thrash your car without warming/cooling daily for three years, theres a good chance it wont qualify for a "London Royal" over 50s plan

Get it remapped and dont go bananas all should be good, thats manufacturers tolrerances built in, but dont come crying on a forum if your engine blows up and youve altered the factory perameters.

Happy remapping
 

FBF01

Registered User
And the ****** rest you old fart

Haaaa, the jealousy is strong I see. The fact I’m so youthful and that I’ve grown a set and looking to go stage 1....you on the other hand lol....chin up lol
 

FBF01

Registered User
....but dont come crying on a forum if your engine blows up and youve altered the factory perameters.

Happy remapping

Lol fill me with confidence why don’t you ha
 

Behind The Bins

Registered User
Lol fill me with confidence why don’t you ha
I think I read that Revo had 30000 miles testing in their remap, but I could be wrong with that

There’s always a wry smile when I read things like that. 30000 miles is a drop in the ocean to what Audi complete in testing and only then are they happy with what the engine, turbo, brakes, suspension etc can take

Will I remap to stage 1, almost definitely if I keep reading on this forum, but I accept the risks
 

FBF01

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Powerenhancer

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Without going off thread what was the outcome with v power if you have tested this to? Be interested to hear mate.
It is a reasonably good fuel. As with momentum it is not additised to deliver the required octane # (i.e. use of MMT, Ferrocene, TMB's etc). It is achieved through the use of octane rich bases providing a more stable MON and RON. Upper cylinder lubrication is good but can be improved and it could benefit from the addition of specific GDI detergents. However, all fuels appear to be behind with this.
 

AudiNutta

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FBF01

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T

T-800

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I had good economy results today as it goes, 140 mile cross country trip... 42.5mpg :p

I’m not the only one see ;)

Very very disappointing......@AudiNutta you are clearly in the wrong car, hand it back immediately then go straight to a Tesla dealer.:blow:
 

NevMan

Well known member
Very very disappointing......@AudiNutta you are clearly in the wrong car, hand it back immediately then go straight to a Tesla dealer.:blow:

Cheaper option...TDI A3
 

AudiNutta

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AudiNutta

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Very very disappointing......@AudiNutta you are clearly in the wrong car, hand it back immediately then go straight to a Tesla dealer.:blow:

Noooo never ;) I’m merely exploring both personalities

The noise machine is here to stay! Although I must admit the glares in a dead silent caravan park on cold start were a little unnerving, not to mention the start-up pops.. :whistle2:

One hell of a machine :racer:
 

AudiNutta

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Powerenhancer

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Without detailing the thread, you are the first person I’ve come across who can probably answer the million dollar question: do fuel additives work? And if so, which one would you recommend?

It is a very generic question and akin to asking “do drugs work?” The answer is both yes and no. It really depends on your requirements and matching them against the functions required to satisfy those requirements. Resolving a running problem? Preventative maintenance/protection? Routine clean? Improve performance? Improve fuel efficiency? Reduce emissions? Bridge an octane deficiency? Reduce foaming? Prevent waxing etc etc? The list is endless.

Additives are frequently misused because customer’s expectations are routinely mismanaged with questionable marketing. They have a place when used correctly, for the right reasons and with an appreciation of the many variables involved.

It is important to differentiate between functions such as (lubricate, clean fuel system, remove carbon deposits, prevent corrosion, demulsify water, improve combustion quality, raise octane etc.) vs benefits such as (reduce emissions, improve MPG, increase performance, reduce engine noise etc.) Some are discernible to the user whilst others require sensitive measuring equipment.

With regards to what I would recommend - what are your requirements? What are you trying to achieve with additives?
 

maxpayne

Registered User
It is a very generic question and akin to asking “do drugs work?” The answer is both yes and no. It really depends on your requirements and matching them against the functions required to satisfy those requirements. Resolving a running problem? Preventative maintenance/protection? Routine clean? Improve performance? Improve fuel efficiency? Reduce emissions? Bridge an octane deficiency? Reduce foaming? Prevent waxing etc etc? The list is endless.

Additives are frequently misused because customer’s expectations are routinely mismanaged with questionable marketing. They have a place when used correctly, for the right reasons and with an appreciation of the many variables involved.

It is important to differentiate between functions such as (lubricate, clean fuel system, remove carbon deposits, prevent corrosion, demulsify water, improve combustion quality, raise octane etc.) vs benefits such as (reduce emissions, improve MPG, increase performance, reduce engine noise etc.) Some are discernible to the user whilst others require sensitive measuring equipment.

With regards to what I would recommend - what are your requirements? What are you trying to achieve with additives?

Hi,
Thanks for a great response. Reading it reminds me of the #Brexit referendum. A complex topic with many facets boiled down to a binary yes/no. Never ends well

To elaborate, at least in my case the car I have is a 2005 A3 2.0T with 78000 miles on board. It’s been serviced properly throughout its lifetime at Audi using OE parts, oil etc. Additionally with some exceptions we’ve always used Shell V-Power for fuelling. The car has had no emission issues/smoke problems and flies through MOT, including no service advisories in the last one. In terms of fuel economy, the car has always been consistent: when driving in city, which is were it gets 80% mileage from (I’m in London), we get around 24MPG but that goes up to 46MPG when doing motorways.

Given the age and mileage of the car, I’m looking at preventative measures that will ensure longevity of the engine and fuel system. Any additional benefit derived, e.g. quieter engine or increased fuel economy would be a plus for sure.

Hope the clarification was useful and apologies for the original almost useless question.
 

Powerenhancer

Registered User
The use of V-power will have helped as combustion quality is better than their standard fuel. This will lower carbonaceous deposits in the combustion and post combustion areas. I can't remember if that engine uses conventional port injection or was one of the first direct injection systems? If port, then the detergent pack in modern gasoline is generally good for port injection engines so the injectors should be in reasonable shape. MPG loss is one of the main symptoms but if consistent as you say then a cleaner may not be justified. If you do consider a cleaner then ensure it contains polyether amine as it will work best with your fuel system and engine.

Hi,
Thanks for a great response. Reading it reminds me of the #Brexit referendum. A complex topic with many facets boiled down to a binary yes/no. Never ends well

To elaborate, at least in my case the car I have is a 2005 A3 2.0T with 78000 miles on board. It’s been serviced properly throughout its lifetime at Audi using OE parts, oil etc. Additionally with some exceptions we’ve always used Shell V-Power for fuelling. The car has had no emission issues/smoke problems and flies through MOT, including no service advisories in the last one. In terms of fuel economy, the car has always been consistent: when driving in city, which is were it gets 80% mileage from (I’m in London), we get around 24MPG but that goes up to 46MPG when doing motorways.

Given the age and mileage of the car, I’m looking at preventative measures that will ensure longevity of the engine and fuel system. Any additional benefit derived, e.g. quieter engine or increased fuel economy would be a plus for sure.

Hope the clarification was useful and apologies for the original almost useless question.
 
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