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Scratched windscreen

spencer361 Nov 29, 2012

  1. spencer361

    spencer361 Member

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    Hy guys, I have light scratches on my windscreen which looks as if they have been caused by a kitchen scotch pad in circles. I also left my car for a week when I went on holiday and after the big rain the UK had, somehow found a gritty material in between my windscreen and wipers, not happy,

    So I need to find a solution..... Does anyone have one?

    Many thanks
     
  2. MacrosTheBlack

    MacrosTheBlack Member

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    I'd suggest seeing if you can find a good local detailer who has a rotary or dual action polisher and some glass cutting pads and glass polishing compound. Ask if they have windscreen experience though as you don't want them heating up laminate glass too much as they do it.

    But a good polish I'm sure would sort it. Or drive behind a gravel truck and hope for a fatal stone chip for a replacement! Lol
     
  3. leach76

    leach76 Member

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    We used these at our work for a customer and the screen was badly scratched and the job was pretty immense
     
  4. chinnyhill10

    chinnyhill10 Member

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    I got a little kit from Amazon with an attachment you fit to your drill. Bloody hard work but it did eliminate most of the scratches and reduced the worst of the others. Previous owner seemed to have a somewhat lax attitude to replacing the wiper blades!
     
  5. fangio

    fangio Well-Known Member

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    Glass

    Dunno how good it is, tho'!
     
  6. the_cueball

    the_cueball Active Member

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    ceridium oxide to polish glass... get someone that knows what they are doing though... it's a messy, tough job and can really damage the glass if done wrong...

    :thumb:
     
  7. spencer361

    spencer361 Member

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    Thanks guys, I went to a glass specialist who mainly deal with houses and etching glass etc. He said not to bother with it as they would not come out and use the brick technique.......

    I'm going to live with it for the winter... I'm off to Chamonix for 5 months and the roads out there are full of grit this time of year so ill look into it at the beginning of next summer.

    cheers for the input! Thats why I love this forum.
     
  8. the_cueball

    the_cueball Active Member

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    The brick technique is usually a lot better and faster, as long as your insurance allows, used that a few times too! :lol:

    :thumb:
     
  9. Boon

    Boon Active Member

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    White hazey scuffs are sometimes worth polishing out but scratches are a different ball game

    As said, cerium oxide, usually a powder mixed to a paste and a felt pad. Better to use on a multi tool pad with sideways movement rather than a drill - but it really is hard going and takes a very long time

    You don't polish the scratch, you have to polish all the glass away surrounding it and that takes time!

    Without seeing it its hard to tell if its worth the time... But normally easier to replace!
     
  10. big harty

    big harty Member

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    Machine mart sell a glass polishing kit. Dirt cheap and very effective
     
  11. chinnyhill10

    chinnyhill10 Member

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    Like I said earlier, I had some fairly deep scratches that I heavily reduced using a kit. Yes it was bloody hard work but the scratches went from deeply annoying to a minor inconvenience. IMO worth it as I don't fancy having sub standard glass fitted and probable windscreen leaks.

    This is what I used:

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Windscreen-...QGXC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1354318784&sr=8-1

    For 16 quid it's worth a punt surely?

    As I say, very hard work (and you must be very careful not to overheat the glass) but it did make a noticeable difference especially at night when the scratches were very annoying.
     
  12. phil76

    phil76 Active Member

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  13. Boon

    Boon Active Member

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    Quote... Taken from Glas Weld...

    Glass is a super cooled liquid and can, even at ambient temperatures, flow. Glass in the windows of an old house, for example, is seen to be thicker at the bottom than at the top. The equipment developed by Glas Weld - Chicago Glass creates the conditions to cause the glass to flow back into the scratch caused by the damage.

    Haha... What a load of bull ****!!

    Glass cannot 'flow' at ambient temperatures, it will take temperatures of 400deg C plus depending on what type of glass

    Glass in 'old houses' used to be hand rolled or 'drawn' therefore a uniform thickness could never be obtained. It won't have dropped due to gravity once it has been produced. It is now produced by 'floating' on mercury hence the name 'float' glass

    I don't see or suppose that anyone could prove that the glass 'flows back into the scratch' during their process. They are removing the glass surrounding the scratch.


    I have been working with glass for 16 years in many aspects commercially & domestically and have removed many hazes and scratches... It can be done... It can take a very long time... And time costs money!

    Glas Weld do a very good job, my uncle used to be a tech for them
     

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