Facelift Winter tires - Time to take responsibility?

NevMan

Well known member
I called Audi assist out twice to change a punctured tyre for me, once away from home and once whilst the car was on the drive. Yes I could have done it myself, but if it had dropped off the supplied jack it would have caused a lot of damage....so I can see why you pay someone to do it :) If I went for winter tyres/alloys on the next car I'd pay for someone to switch them over, luckily I have space to store them myself.

PS: The new JCW is up on the site to build :)

Max. Torque 320 Nm :blink:
Power 231 HP

View attachment 174882
View attachment 174883

Very true, the supplied jacks are cr*p! I used to have a decent big hydraulic one, but goodness only knows what happened to that. As I have a gravel drive now, haven’t bothered getting another, and as mentioned Paying £120 for two changeovers and storage does it for me. Plus if they scratch an alloy, it is my dealer and they shall fix it!

Very nice (JCW) I will take a look
 

NevMan

Well known member
And cars look utter poop with winter wheels. IMHO. Am not paying the amount I do a month to have it looking rubbish.

That is only if you buy “poop” winter alloys. As others have said, always deals around. I got a set of OEM wheels and quite like the change of look for a few months, whilst my nice summer alloys and tyres are tucked up.
 

NevMan

Well known member
I personally just don’t think winter wheels are worth it, be it financially or otherwise. This year we didn’t have any bad weather that would even closely justify winter wheels until well into jan. likelihood is we might have up to a month of poor conditions maximum and that is fairly typical. Drive to the conditions. Stay safe everyone.

Don’t knock until you have tried it, or personally experienced the grip, stopping benefits etc of winter tyres.
 

NevMan

Well known member
a) I agree, q5man; £120 would do it for me, too; makes a lotta sense. b) The 286bhp 3.0tdi does it for us. Back to back with a new petrol SQ5 at our Stafford Audi meet (which you missed :sadlike:) this 3.0tdi:

https://www.swanswaygarages.com/aud...i-q5-s-line-3.0-tdi-quattro-286-ps-tiptronic/

was so much more preferred for ride (even in Dynamic) and get-up-and-go over local/A-rods we generally use; oh so tempting.

That said, in two of our NHS visits this week we were mega happy to be parking our A1 in the limited space(s) available: like I say, "wants" (the SQ5/Q5) and "needs" (the A1) can be quite different.

Getting a 2.0tdi 'loaner' at the end of the month for further evaluation... :racer:

In the meantime, gonna enjoy the Audi cars we have for now - let it snow, let it snow, let it snow...
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As mentioned earlier the diesel SQ5 was a stonker. I am enjoying my 2.0 petrol, bit feel a six cylinder will be next.

I don’t struggle parking Q5, but wife having had A1 before, they are cracking little cars, but I do prefer her JCW at the mo . Your current collection is a very nice mix
 

NevMan

Well known member
Oh and still gutted I couldn’t make the Stafford meet, but thanks for rubbing in...again!
 

cuke2u

Registered User
I am also one 'idiot' who doesn't fit winter tyres as well and also drive to the conditions, or, if the conditions are too bad I don't drive at all. Certainly not going to waste hundreds of pounds on tyres for that one day of the year it snowed on my daily commute of five miles at an average of 20 miles an hour. Or even for when it is cold and wet.
Even with 400Nm through my front wheels I had no issues in the south on friday. Hell if it was bad enough my place of work, being a school, closes anyway.

It's the idiots who don't heed the warnings and still drive in conditions beyond their skills that worry me, winter tyres or not. Then there are those who are blatantly over confident in their quattro or snow tyres abilities..
 
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Flying Scotsman

Registered User
Personally, I have no issue with people that do not put on winter tyres and generally speaking that means areas that rarely get snow. But, if you are in that group, do not attempt to drive on snow and ice covered roads. As you have no experience of how to drive under those conditions. Therefore, summer tyres and those conditions either walk or park it. For all others with summer tyres on snow and icy conditions, drive to the conditions and that takes practise and if the snow is over 40mm park it If you are an inexperienced driver find a deserted parking lot and practise opposite lock to control a skid and how long it takes to slow the car down and how to get moving the car from a stop. There is nothing more hilarious than to watch a driver spinning the wheels at very high speed. Also learn how to rock the car from forward gear to reverse gear to get out of a rut.
I live in an area that gets snow and I have high performance all season tyres on my car, but park it when the snow is above 5omm and that is in area that is prepared for winter conditions;lots of snow ploughs, brine and salt applied to the roads and no gritters. But some side roads may take some time to be cleared, as major routes/minor get priority.
As others have mentioned winter tyres are not just for snow but are fantastic in icy conditions
 

NevMan

Well known member
a) I agree, q5man; £120 would do it for me, too; makes a lotta sense. b) The 286bhp 3.0tdi does it for us. Back to back with a new petrol SQ5 at our Stafford Audi meet (which you missed :sadlike:) this 3.0tdi:

https://www.swanswaygarages.com/aud...i-q5-s-line-3.0-tdi-quattro-286-ps-tiptronic/

was so much more preferred for ride (even in Dynamic) and get-up-and-go over local/A-rods we generally use; oh so tempting.

That said, in two of our NHS visits this week we were mega happy to be parking our A1 in the limited space(s) available: like I say, "wants" (the SQ5/Q5) and "needs" (the A1) can be quite different.

Getting a 2.0tdi 'loaner' at the end of the month for further evaluation... :racer:

In the meantime, gonna enjoy the Audi cars we have for now - let it snow, let it snow, let it snow...
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Nice Q5 mate. LOVE Daytona, still one of my favourites, and a nice spec Q5...go for it
 

NevMan

Well known member
Oh, and LOVE those alloys!!!
 

45bvtc

The Older I Get The Better I Was
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Gold Supporter
Oh, and LOVE those alloys!!!

They were/are a negative for me as was the brushed aluminium interior trim, not that either couldn't be changed; and then there was that dent in the nearside rear door and panel...
:whistle2:
 
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wab172uk

Now in an X3 M40i And a Yaris GR-Four
The problem over here is that we can go years without any snow, then we get 1cm of snow and the country stops! If we were in a country that gets snow each year without fail, then I'm sure more people would have snow alloys/tyres.

I always feel embarrassed as a nation when it's all over the news telling people to stock up on food, stay indoors, don't drive until absolutely necessary and then show you why:

Example:
View attachment 174833

And then you see other countries just getting on with it:
View attachment 174834


This ^^^

It's an absolute embarrassment that every year without fail, Britain grinds to a standstill due to just a couple cm of snow.

The biggest culprit is people just don't know how to drive to the conditions. Get a bit of wheel spin, and they think revving it up to the limiter will somehow get the tyres gripping. They then come to a halt, and we then have grid lock.

Thankfully I work from home now, so don't have to endure the grid lock on a morning trying to get into work.

For me, it should now be law, just like in Germany. If it did become law, then Garages (just like in Germany) would be set up to store your tyres for you through the warmer months, and swap them over through the winter months.

But, this is Britain, so ...............

  • Mass complaints about the cost of buying winter tyres.
  • Half the people thinking they don't need them, so don't fit them, and grid lock continues anyway
  • Mass complaints thinking the Government should pay for their tyres
  • The Tax payer no doubt paying for those who choose the Benefits career path.
  • Garages won't stock your tyres so you have to fill your car, then house with 4 tyres all year round.
  • Criminal gangs making money by steeling wheels fitted with winter tyres.
So just the usual sh**e that makes Britain the unique place it is.
 

45bvtc

The Older I Get The Better I Was
Supporter
Gold Supporter
Not to mention where ALL this road salt (road salt is halite, which is the natural mined mineral form of table salt or sodium chloride (NaCl)) goes: up the side and underside of your hard earned motor car - suspension components just love road salt - and eventually into brooks, rivers and waterways.

I mean, even the health lobby want us to use less salt...
5339.gif
 

desertstorm

Moderator
Staff member
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VCDS Map User
I would say most drivers have never tried winter tyres on a car so would not appreciate the difference they make. As most drivers look at a tyre and see a black round circle, As long as it's not flat at the bottom and it has visible lines on it around the outside it's good.
That of course doesn't apply to people on these kind of forums as we obviously have an interest in cars.
Even if 50% of the cars on the road used winter tyres it only takes a few cars or a truck/ bus without winter tyres to block a road. Yes you have to store the tyres but stack them in a pile and they take up little space. When you have winter tyres on your not wearing out your summer tyres. I have winter wheels for my A4 and the wifes Polo, and have done for many years now. To get off our estate without them is very difficult
She really appreciates the fact that she can drive a lot easier and safely in the snow even if that's only a few days a year. Some people think nothing of buying a pair of trainers for £100 but they would moan if they had to spend another £20 or £30 a tyre for their car to get a decent tyre.
People tend to have several sets of shoes for different things. Trainers for the gym, wellies for taking the dog for a walk over the fields, and of course a normal pair of shoes. You wouldn't wear the wellies to goto the gym so why try and drive in the snow with summer tyres ?.
 

RAF_S7

Well-Known Member
Gold Supporter
I lived in Germany for a few years when younger, and always put a set of winters on as they were essential for getting up the hill to where I was living. I still put on a set between November and March, and currently have a set on the S7, out of habit and experience I guess.

The thing to remember about winter tyres (as opposed to snow tyres) is that they improve grip in all road conditions where the temperature is below about 10degC, so they are not just for the snow conditions we (occasionally) have in the UK - though if I recall correctly Feb 2017 was way worse for snow conditions that we currently have.

On cost, well I see them as insurance, just in case we have bad weather. l would never buy from Audi direct. There are plenty of eBay deals on winter tyres + rims, especially from German sellers. My current set of 19” alloys and Continental winters cost me £900 plus £25 delivery from Germany five years ago, and I’m still using them for 3/4 months of the year. And yes, you do save your summer tyres, so it can be cost effective. My 20” summer P-Zeros now need changing after 3 years of use, and with the car mileage just over 40,000. Treads are 2mm. But don’t get me started on the cost of replacement P-Zeros!

Storage can be an issue, since I have a small garage that I can just fit the 7 in, however I have a local (independent) tyre shop, who for £35 not only store my wheels, they also change them over as needed. Google “tyre hotel” for your local area, you may be surprised - but you won’t get this service in any of the national retail tyre chains.

My summer alloys are currently being refurbished while the winters are on, another benefit of having a winter set.

Drive carefully :racer:
 

Pook

Registered User
Don’t knock until you have tried it, or personally experienced the grip, stopping benefits etc of winter tyres.
Thing is I don’t struggle with grip or stopping distance with my summer tyres because I drive to the conditions. If I had winter wheels, potentially I could drive a little faster and maintain the same grip and stopping distances, but I wouldn’t do that.
 

cuke2u

Registered User
Thing is I don’t struggle with grip or stopping distance with my summer tyres because I drive to the conditions. If I had winter wheels, potentially I could drive a little faster and maintain the same grip and stopping distances, but I wouldn’t do that.
This, nobody is knocking winter tyres but each person need to evaluate if there are any benefits that the extra costs bring to their particular situation.
 

NevMan

Well known member
This, nobody is knocking winter tyres but each person need to evaluate if there are any benefits that the extra costs bring to their particular situation.

Absolutely, all personal choice.
Just like those of us trying to convince ourselves at times we really need an expensive car, and more often than not certainly in wk yet conditions the small cars with thinner summer tyres cope better
 

NevMan

Well known member
Thing is I don’t struggle with grip or stopping distance with my summer tyres because I drive to the conditions. If I had winter wheels, potentially I could drive a little faster and maintain the same grip and stopping distances, but I wouldn’t do that.

Wasn’t suggesting you struggled with grip or in fact stopping distance, but when you have driven the same car in the same conditions (more or less) with both you would know what I mean. I live out in the country and we have some steep and tricky ungritted roads. Some of my neighbours have struggled, even with 4x4’s, not me, but then I am driving to the conditions just with winters on
 

oli356

Registered User
What I hate about all of this driving to the conditions **** is what about the unexpected.

Let's say you were driving far behind the car infront, but then a vechile turned out of a side road or something and you needed to brake, but now there wasn't a safe enough distance.

Its just an example but the roads aren't always about how you drive, but how others drive too.
 

Dan99

Registered User
Much of this discussion seems to miss the point of winter tires.

Each type of tire is designed to work in a particular temperature range. A tire that works well in high performance summer conditions gets hard in cold weather and provides less traction regardless of wet or dry roads. Conversely, a tire that works really well in cold conditions turns to goo in hot weather and gets eaten alive by the pavement. All Season tires are simply a compromise. They target the middle temperature range and work well there, but do not match the performance of the others as temperatures climb or drop out of the middle.

So, the first question to ask is what type of car do you have and will it benefit from high performance summer tires? If not, you should probably get All Season tires and call it a day. However, if your car has or will benefit from summer tires, and your budget allows, you should get both. Don't try to swap tires on the same wheels though. You need two sets of wheels and tires. You will find that winter tires have advantages whether the roads are wet or dry.

My wife has been driving 4 wheel drive vehicles and I have been driving performance cars for the last 30 years. Hers always come with All Season tires and mine with summer performance tires. I learned early on that the summer tires are **** in the winter, even on dry pavement, and I have been using winter tires ever since. My wife currently has a Jeep with All Season tires. When it snows she always asks if I want to take the Jeep, but we always take my Audi. The Audi with winter tires (Michelin) is significantly better on bad roads than the Jeep.

So, yes you can drive to the conditions, but winter tires are simply better as the weather gets colder and summer tires are simply better when it's hot.
 

NevMan

Well known member

Flying Scotsman

Registered User
The above mention of high performance summer tyres and temperatures are spot on. As I have mentioned before all high performance summer tyres are not suitable for temperatures below 7 Celsius. I have chosen the compromise of Pirelli P Zero high performance all season tyres ( not available in the UK). The difference between those tyres and the P Zero summer tyres that came with the car is negligible for my style of driving and the roads I drive on. The P Zero on a hot summer day will offer more grip for very spirited driving on demanding twisty country roads, but honestly how many of you drive like that, maybe twice a month or? Roads and traffic limit that experience for most, apart from track days.
If you can afford it nothing beats winter and summer tyres, but summer tyres for most regions of the UK are a liability during cold, icy and snowy days and how many of you are white knuckling it in adverse conditions. To be very honest on the first snowfall of the year I take the bus and that is in Canada where we do get adverse conditions.
Driving to to the conditions is good advice with a properly equipped tyre, but that does not include summer tyres
 

Carefree69

Registered User
What I hate about all of this driving to the conditions **** is what about the unexpected.

Let's say you were driving far behind the car infront, but then a vechile turned out of a side road or something and you needed to brake, but now there wasn't a safe enough distance.

Its just an example but the roads aren't always about how you drive, but how others drive too.
The unexpected can and does happen on warm dry days with summer tyres fitted, it’s irrelevant what tyres you have or what the conditions are.

Driving according to the conditions doesn’t just mean in the winter, it’s year round.

I am a qualified EFAD driver and we are taught to expect everything on the road. That includes people overtaking, pulling out from side roads, braking unexpectedly etc etc etc. If everyone drove expecting the worst and being prepared to react then accidents would fall like a stone.

You like winter tyres and think that they are necessary in a typical U.K. winter and some of us don’t.

Simple as that, no one is wrong:hi:
 

AlS3BE

Registered User
If everyone drove expecting the worst and being prepared to react then accidents would fall like a stone

You sound a bit like my mates dad :wink:
He used to say something similar although he also said if we all drove around with a big spike pointing to our face from the steering wheel accidents will become a thing of the past:witless:
 

Carefree69

Registered User
You sound a bit like my mates dad :wink:
He used to say something similar although he also said if we all drove around with a big spike pointing to our face from the steering wheel accidents will become a thing of the past:witless:
He had a good point though.
 

oli356

Registered User
The unexpected can and does happen on warm dry days with summer tyres fitted, it’s irrelevant what tyres you have or what the conditions are.
Of course it isn't irrelevant. Having a better tyre for the conditions will mean you are more likely to avoid an accident if you are in the situation when something unexpected happens and you need to slow down quicker.

Same logic with tyre tread. New tyres will grip better than worn tyres if a bit wet, car with newer tyres in the middle of August on a damp road is more likely to stop quicker and mitigate the risk of accident.

Not rocket science...
 

Ormesome

Registered User
Of course it isn't irrelevant. Having a better tyre for the conditions will mean you are more likely to avoid an accident if you are in the situation when something unexpected happens and you need to slow down quicker.

Exactly this! Most people miss the point of this whole thread, come in barging with ridiculous comments! All it takes to see sense is that the UK for around 5 months of the year, averages temperatures under 8 degrees, and that's not looking more in-depth at the normal commuting times as the temp then is even lower and approaching freezing or less. Summer tires at these temps do not provide as much grip as winter tires. Fact! End of! Yes you may drive to the conditions and yes you may be Nigel Mansell in disguise and be able to control ludricous skids that even Fast&Furious directors would be unable to recreate. One comment from the article I posted a few comments above had an interesting question:

Can’t I just buy a set of winter tyres and leave them on all year?
Yes, you can, but we wouldn’t recommend it. Above 7oC, the softer compound gives the same effect as running summer tyres in winter conditions – that is to say, longer stopping distances and a heightened proclivity for skidding in corners.

Would you run winter tires in summer? I guess not? Then why do the reverse when the facts suggest you will be safer otherwise? Either way, the facts are there. I got to work in this morning in the conditions in the photo below. I think the car next to me has summer tires on!! :racer:


IMG_3623.jpeg
 

NevMan

Well known member
Exactly this! Most people miss the point of this whole thread, come in barging with ridiculous comments! All it takes to see sense is that the UK for around 5 months of the year, averages temperatures under 8 degrees, and that's not looking more in-depth at the normal commuting times as the temp then is even lower and approaching freezing or less. Summer tires at these temps do not provide as much grip as winter tires. Fact! End of! Yes you may drive to the conditions and yes you may be Nigel Mansell in disguise and be able to control ludricous skids that even Fast&Furious directors would be unable to recreate. One comment from the article I posted a few comments above had an interesting question:

Can’t I just buy a set of winter tyres and leave them on all year?
Yes, you can, but we wouldn’t recommend it. Above 7oC, the softer compound gives the same effect as running summer tyres in winter conditions – that is to say, longer stopping distances and a heightened proclivity for skidding in corners.

Would you run winter tires in summer? I guess not? Then why do the reverse when the facts suggest you will be safer otherwise? Either way, the facts are there. I got to work in this morning in the conditions in the photo below. I think the car next to me has summer tires on!! :racer:


View attachment 175149

Wasting your time even responding to our “learned” friend Mr Carefree. Most in this forum provide constructive feedback and opinion, he (or she) is just a wind up merchant who fights fires in shorts, t-shirt and flip flops end of
 

AlS3BE

Registered User
I think the compromise in the UK is all season type tyres. We don’t get the extremes lows and high temps very often. Perfectly fine for your average driver. If I had a 1.0 50hp fiesta I would be be using all season but I don’t.
For me I drive a performance car so want the best in the summer so a performance summer tyres like the pzero from factory is very good especially I like pushing it a bit. In the winter these performance summer tyres aren’t the best due to the rubber compound and tread design. So I opt for a decent set of winter tyres/wheels to make sure I can get around and check on my elderly folks and also if something was to happen I can make it to the hospital in any weather.
Other thing for me is the summer set of wheels are diamond cut and from experience with Audi and other manufacturers diamond cut wheels are really bad for corrosion especially in the winter salt/grit even with stuff like ceramic coatings. The winter wheels saves my summer wheels and keeps them looking good.
 

NevMan

Well known member
I think the compromise in the UK is all season type tyres. We don’t get the extremes lows and high temps very often. Perfectly fine for your average driver. If I had a 1.0 50hp fiesta I would be be using all season but I don’t.
For me I drive a performance car so want the best in the summer so a performance summer tyres like the pzero from factory is very good especially I like pushing it a bit. In the winter these performance summer tyres aren’t the best due to the rubber compound and tread design. So I opt for a decent set of winter tyres/wheels to make sure I can get around and check on my elderly folks and also if something was to happen I can make it to the hospital in any weather.
Other thing for me is the summer set of wheels are diamond cut and from experience with Audi and other manufacturers diamond cut wheels are really bad for corrosion especially in the winter salt/grit even with stuff like ceramic coatings. The winter wheels saves my summer wheels and keeps them looking good.

Very true, there are fans of the all season tyres, and they do appear to be getting better. I too choose to save my nice diamond cut alloys for the summer, as well as saving tyre wear. Winter tyres definitely outlast the cars I have, but will be keeping this one for at least another 2 winters if not more...he says
 

S32B

Registered User
Exactly this! Most people miss the point of this whole thread, come in barging with ridiculous comments! All it takes to see sense is that the UK for around 5 months of the year, averages temperatures under 8 degrees, and that's not looking more in-depth at the normal commuting times as the temp then is even lower and approaching freezing or less. Summer tires at these temps do not provide as much grip as winter tires. Fact! End of! Yes you may drive to the conditions and yes you may be Nigel Mansell in disguise and be able to control ludricous skids that even Fast&Furious directors would be unable to recreate. One comment from the article I posted a few comments above had an interesting question:

Can’t I just buy a set of winter tyres and leave them on all year?
Yes, you can, but we wouldn’t recommend it. Above 7oC, the softer compound gives the same effect as running summer tyres in winter conditions – that is to say, longer stopping distances and a heightened proclivity for skidding in corners.

Would you run winter tires in summer? I guess not? Then why do the reverse when the facts suggest you will be safer otherwise? Either way, the facts are there. I got to work in this morning in the conditions in the photo below. I think the car next to me has summer tires on!! :racer:


View attachment 175149
lol I took this subject into work as there a rather a few petrol heads in there, it started off with the knee jerk comments "No waste of time we don't get enough snow yada yada yada..." I then explained about the under 8-9 degrees, saving on your summer tyres etc etc as mentioned in this thread....at the end we were all converted to the idea of winter tyres lol.

PS: Excellent thread for a forum :)
 

Ormesome

Registered User
lol I took this subject into work as there a rather a few petrol heads in there, it started off with the knee jerk comments "No waste of time we don't get enough snow yada yada yada..." I then explained about the under 8-9 degrees, saving on your summer tyres etc etc as mentioned in this thread....at the end we were all converted to the idea of winter tyres lol.

PS: Excellent thread for a forum :)

Nice one mate! Little by little, we can turn peoples opinions around. It won't take much. It just takes a few to influence others, especially if we see more people driving in the snow and not getting stuck. Pretty sure that people would start to wonder, look into it and start to ponder the benefits. Unfortunately, it will probably take more winters of snow to make people realise as normal wintry conditions won't make the tires stand out to your average motorist driving behind you.
 

45bvtc

The Older I Get The Better I Was
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As the thread title says "Time to take responsibility?" Personally I don't care what tyres anyone else uses so long as they stay away from me! That they get stuck going wherever and for whatever and with whomever in conditions unsuitable for the equipment they are using id OK by me. I'm sick of their excuses i.e., the gritters haven't cleared the roads! Tough, get over it, stay indoors till the snow goes....

I enjoy the 'bite' of winter tyres on sub 7ºC and/or snow covered roads; for me tis fun, fun, fun... :racer:

Maybe it's an age thing, time I got over it, moved on, etc...
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Ormesome

Registered User
That's a stunning looking Q2. Nice, great colour combo. I like it, lots...
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Cheers mate. To be honest, I'm not a big Q2 fan normally, but when I saw this one in my local dealership I was won over. The 19 inch alloys & S-Line trim make it such a different car to the others I had seen. I'm not sure that the 190bhp 2.0tdi is offered in the UK. Pulls pretty well with the S-tronic and Quattro system. Been great in the snow here. :icon thumright:
 

cuke2u

Registered User
Possibly, if it is true about them, then manufacturers could well fit all season tyres. However nothing here has still convinced me I need to fit 'winter' tyres...
 
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45bvtc

The Older I Get The Better I Was
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Gold Supporter
Cheers mate. To be honest, I'm not a big Q2 fan normally, but when I saw this one in my local dealership I was won over. The 19 inch alloys & S-Line trim make it such a different car to the others I had seen. I'm not sure that the 190bhp 2.0tdi is offered in the UK. Pulls pretty well with the S-tronic and Quattro system. Been great in the snow here. :icon thumright:

Looks stunning though I'm now looking at a 286bhp Q5 as a replacement for our A1, TT, and RS3 - eventually; and I do mean 'eventually' i.e., not yet!

 

NevMan

Well known member
As the thread title says "Time to take responsibility?" Personally I don't care what tyres anyone else uses so long as they stay away from me! That they get stuck going wherever and for whatever and with whomever in conditions unsuitable for the equipment they are using id OK by me. I'm sick of their excuses i.e., the gritters haven't cleared the roads! Tough, get over it, stay indoors till the snow goes....

I enjoy the 'bite' of winter tyres on sub 7ºC and/or snow covered roads; for me tis fun, fun, fun... :racer:

Maybe it's an age thing, time I got over it, moved on, etc...
5255.gif

Brilliant post mate
 

Carefree69

Registered User
Of course it isn't irrelevant. Having a better tyre for the conditions will mean you are more likely to avoid an accident if you are in the situation when something unexpected happens and you need to slow down quicker.

Same logic with tyre tread. New tyres will grip better than worn tyres if a bit wet, car with newer tyres in the middle of August on a damp road is more likely to stop quicker and mitigate the risk of accident.

Not rocket science...
Drive according to the conditions.

Not rocket science.
 
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