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Ouch! But a testament to the engineering of the cabin!

Matty_S3 Oct 13, 2017

  1. Matty_S3

    Matty_S3 Active Member Team Glacier Audi S3

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  2. desertstorm

    desertstorm Moderator Staff Member Moderator VCDS Map User Audi A4 Audi Avant Owner Group quattro TDi

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    Ouch, Looks like he didn't know that road very well as he should have been braking a lot earlier. Luckily they got away with it.
     
  3. RichardT

    RichardT Well-Known Member Team Brill Red saloon Audi A3

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    Or maybe not going so fast in the first place. Amazing no one was hurt. That could have been so much worse - really stupid behaviour.
     
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  4. mikemod

    mikemod Well-Known Member Team Tango Audi S3

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    Circuit de Chimay, looks like he missed the turn at the top left :scared2:

    circuit.jpg
     
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  5. Mark_86

    Mark_86 Well-Known Member Team Daytona Audi S3 Black Edition quattro DSG

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    Oooo... bet that left a bruise. You see him apply the brakes as he turns right going up the hill (gets a wobble on), it's at that point he realised he'd f*cked up.
     
    Audi Bairn and GTAIVgunner like this.
  6. JunkStory

    JunkStory Member

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    don't go over 6/10 if unfamiliar with the track...
     
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  7. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    Idiot.

    I cut idiots like him from cars at least once a tour. No sympathy whatsoever.

    I don't give a stuff what happens to people who excessively speed, it's the innocent victims I care about.

    I realise that this was on a track, but the principle is the same.
     
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  8. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    Once a shift..!?
    That's a lot of tool work, where are you located that you're this busy?
    Also, do you find the cutting to be any more difficult on Audis; as some auto makers are utilizing more exotic and harder to cut metals?


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  9. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    Once a tour (a tour being 2 x days and then 2 x nights).

    Perhaps not exactly once every tour, but certainly on a regular basis.

    I wouldn’t say that Audi’s/VW/Mercedes etc are any harder to cut than others but it is very apparent that these types of cars are much better built than others.

    One of the most challenging cars to cut and/or spread are Smart cars, but even then the Holmatro tools we use are more than up to the job.
     
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  10. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    Yeah, that was going to be my next question as far as what type of tool you used.
    I was in a FD Truck company and found it very interesting and a challenge to gain knowledge regarding the different models with exotic metals that use and where they're strategically placed.
    The other half of the challenge was locating the battery on the vehicle as that's the first thing you really want to tackle. Everything becomes much much safer once that is taken out of the equation.


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  11. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    I agree with the cocoon like life saving qualities of these vehicles also.
    Mercedes, Audi, Volvo, are all good examples.
    There's a video floating around on You Tube of a Benz on the Autobahn wrecking at about 160mph, when the car finally comes to a rest after somersaulting too many times to count; there's an eerie minute of no activity and silence and then the occupant amazingly is able to climb out.


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  12. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    Literally the first thing when on scene at an rta is to disconnect the battery (to lessen the chance of any airbag going off whist crews are working inside etc) and luckily our trucks are fitted with MDT’s (mobile data terminals) which can provide us with very valuable vehicle information. For instance, if you want to know where the battery is located (BMW generally have them in the boot) or where all the airbags are on a certain make of car.

    The MDT will give you various ‘see through’ views of the particular make that you want info on, and show you pretty much where all the important parts of that car are located (airbags, batteries, seat belt tensioners etc).
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2017
  13. desertstorm

    desertstorm Moderator Staff Member Moderator VCDS Map User Audi A4 Audi Avant Owner Group quattro TDi

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    Hybrid or fully electric cars must make your job a nightmare then. Can't just cut through the nearest thick cable when there is a 2-300v battery on the other end of it.
     
  14. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    Modern cars have made it trickier I’ll admit, however before ANY cutting or spreading is carried out we do what’s called a ‘peel and reveal’ on the car(s) involved.

    Basically a peel and reveal is exactly what it says it is, we peel (remove) any interior trim that is likely to conceal any dangers to us (fire crews) and any trapped persons. For instance, seat belt tensioners or airbags etc.

    Once revealed we know exactly where we can make the relevant cuts etc.

    As for a car battery we tend not to cut the power we just simply disconnect it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 16, 2017
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  15. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    Interesting approach!


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  16. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    Is it much different in the States?
     
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  17. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    Not so much that it's a different approach, I myself never want to use tools such as s halogen or other hand tools to start exposing innards simply because there's just so much uncertainty as to what might set into motion some unwanted consequences.
    I believe that although we use many similar techniques each crew or even individual will have their own personal approach.
    It's never a level playing field as each "tool job" presents it own unique set of circumstances.



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  18. Carefree69

    Carefree69 Well-Known Member

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    All we do is remove trim (A,B pillars etc) to expose anything which might present a danger to us when cutting etc.

    The alternative to cutting blind doesn’t bear thinking about, hence why we do it.

    Whilst each individual or crew might have their own approach we still follow a prescribed set of procedures at rta’s or fires etc and any freelancing in the LFB is rightly frowned upon.
     
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  19. surfer8210

    surfer8210 New Member

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    Of course, consistency in training using similar approaches will get everyone onto the same page as far as what expectations are in regards to actions although creativity and new ideas I feel should be encouraged but not when it brings about 'freelancing'.!!


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