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DIY Brake Change Question

Alex156 Sep 17, 2020

  1. Alex156

    Alex156 Registered User

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    Hi All,

    I'm writing in relation to my 2006 3.0 A6 Allroad. Time has come to change the rear discs and pads. I've done this job countless times on other vehicles and am OK with the release of the EPB (I have VAGCOM) etc. but am hoping that someone can clarify the CORRECT procedure for this job, especially when it comes to pushing the caliper piston back.

    Now, most mechanics I speak to simply say, take the cap of the brake fluid reservoir and push the piston back, using a screwdriver or appropriate tool. Now ordinarily that's what I'd have expected although when I last referred to a well know car repair manual (all be it for a different make/model) it stated that when pushing the piston back in it was ESSENTIAL that the hose be clamped and the bleed nipple opened. It was stated that this was to ensure no seals were 'flipped' by the back-flow of fluid and so that none of the contaminated fluid from the caliper found it's way back into the system which could cause issues/damage to sensitive ABS components.

    Can ANYONE clarify what is the correct procedure as it's driving me nuts not being able to find a definitive answer to this one?

    Thanks,

    Alex
     
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  3. AFONE

    AFONE Registered User

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    I’m no certified Audi mechanic but I’ve done the brakes on my A6 a few times (plus other vehicles). I never open the brake fluid reservoir with the reason being that it could introduce air into the system and then I’ll have to follow up the brake change with bleeding the fluid. Instead, I simply use the old brake pad to cover the piston and a c-clamp to press the piston back in.

    Also, when in doubt, refer to YouTube.

    Good luck with your brake change. It’s pretty straight forward.

    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalkr
     
    Last edited: Sep 17, 2020
  4. B5NUT

    B5NUT Well-Known Member VCDS Map User

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    There should be no dirt inside the calipers to start with, if dirt is getting in then the seals are damaged and need replacing.

    Job is simple enough, open reservoir cap, use VCDS to put the calipers in the "Open" position then push the piston back (buy the right tool they are around £10-£15) make sure you just push the piston back, it should not be wound back! Fit new pads "Close" the caliper with VCDS and job is done.

    If you have not changed the brake fluid in the last few years then do that as well. It's simple enough just let gravity do the job and keep topping up the fluid in the reservoir.

    One point to note is you don't need to remove the the caliper mount on the 3.0TDI, there is enough room to remove the disc without removing the mount.
     
  5. Alex156

    Alex156 Registered User

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    Thanks for this. I have a tool (none-winding) coming tomorrow. I'm not sure when the brake fluid was last changed however this is something I've never done so not overly confident..... Thanks for the tip off re caliper mount. I've bought the bolts just in case as I believe they're single use but great if i don't need to.

    So no need to clamp the hose and no risk to the seals, ABS system etc. if I just push the piston back?
     
  6. B5NUT

    B5NUT Well-Known Member VCDS Map User

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    Bleeding is a simple job, just crack off the bleed nipple (stick a pipe on the end to catch the fluid) and watch the fluid pour out. Just keep an eye on the reservoir. I normally bleed in this order

    Rear drivers 1st, rear passenger 2nd, drivers front 3rd and passenger front 4th. I buy a litre of fluid and drain 400ml from the Rear drivers side, then 200ml on the other 3. You may as well use all of the can as the fluid is hygroscopic so best to buy fresh every 3 years. You could also use something like gunson eezibleed if you're in a rush to do the job.
     

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