Facelift Audi PCP contribution now £2780! Is this the best it will get?

gazza53

Registered User
Well Audi PCP contribution has gone up from £850 to £2780. Can it only get better as its now becoming a run out model with the 2019 model due out summer next year. Bag a bargain now or wait until the end of the year or early into next. Can the PCP contribution only get better along with discounts or is the drive the deal discount who only give you £1780 of the £2780 contribution the best it is likly to get at around und £5700 discount on and £31k car?

Think Audi now see the Mercedes A class as possible challange to A3 sales so are making the A3 look more attractive on finance.
 
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MaffewEM

Registered User
That's so annoying, if only they had done that a little bit earlier... although it's at 6.4% whereas I'm sure mine is 4.5%
 

gazza53

Registered User
Yes 6.4% instead of 4.9% but just settle the PCP loan after 2 weeks bag the discount and refinance the loan using a car loan at 3.1%?
 

Daveotto

Moderator
Staff member
Moderator
All car makers are struggling to shift their cars hence increasing deposit contributions etc....some Mercedes models are running at nearly 20% discount if you look around.

To the OP, if you are happy with the contribution and can afford the payments go for it
 

oli356

Registered User
Who knows.

Buy a car already before you find something else you don't like about it ;)

Do Audi ever do 0% deals? I think bmw were doing a few recently, X3? And a couple other models.
 

Bells

Registered User
Who knows.

Buy a car already before you find something else you don't like about it ;)

Do Audi ever do 0% deals? I think bmw were doing a few recently, X3? And a couple other models.
I’ve seen a few special offers at my local dealer on used approved cars offering 0% finance but never on new cars to my knowledge.
 

B5NUT

Well-Known Member
VCDS Map User
As Jassy pointed on another thread it will impact residuals of used models, higher the contribution the worse it gets. Just make sure your deposit covers some of the initial higher negative equity, if you need to get rid of the car for any reason.
 

ScottG

Registered User
Well Audi PCP contribution has gone up from £850 to £2780. Can it only get better as its now becoming a run out model with the 2019 model due out summer next year. Bag a bargain now or wait until the end of the year or early into next. Can the PCP contribution only get better along with discounts or is the drive the deal discount who only give you £1780 of the £2780 contribution the best it is likly to get at around und £5700 discount on and £31k car?

Think Audi now see the Mercedes A class as possible challange to A3 sales so are making the A3 look more attractive on finance.

Where are you seeing this information ? Is it available online ?
 

Chris43

Registered User
Bagging the discount then refinancing the PCP with a car loan may save some interest due on the monthly payments. However, with a PCP you can give the car back when 50% of the finance value is repayed. This gives you some protection from used car values dropping like a stone and putting your car into negative equity. VWFS have to take the car back and suck up the negative equity as per the PCP agreement

The 50% rule doesn't apply to car loans meaning you have no choice but to either pay the full term of the loan or find the short fall to clear the negative equity if you decide to sell early. There is no saying how hard the 2019 A3 will hit used values. Its down to personal choice in the end but if I was buying an A3 now I would be tempted to take the PCP and the protection it offers.
 

oli356

Registered User

mikemod

Registered User
The increase in interest rate balances the extra contribution so the monthly figure ends up about the same, just looks more attractive.
With an interest rate of 4.9% and a dealer contribution of £850 and the same figures above the repayments work out about £430 instead of £425.
 

ScottG

Registered User
I ca
The increase in interest rate balances the extra contribution so the monthly figure ends up about the same, just looks more attractive.
With an interest rate of 4.9% and a dealer contribution of £850 and the same figures above the repayments work out about £430 instead of £425.

I called my dealer this morning and it actually works out more expensive - it just looks good.
 

mikemod

Registered User
It could be they have changed the Optional final payment as well, reducing this by £1000 can increase the monthly payment by £20 - £30
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
Who knows.

Buy a car already before you find something else you don't like about it ;)

Do Audi ever do 0% deals? I think bmw were doing a few recently, X3? And a couple other models.
You'll only get a small discount on the new X3 £2k
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
Well Audi PCP contribution has gone up from £850 to £2780. Can it only get better as its now becoming a run out model with the 2019 model due out summer next year. Bag a bargain now or wait until the end of the year or early into next. Can the PCP contribution only get better along with discounts or is the drive the deal discount who only give you £1780 of the £2780 contribution the best it is likly to get at around und £5700 discount on and £31k car?

Think Audi now see the Mercedes A class as possible challange to A3 sales so are making the A3 look more attractive on finance.

Run out model .... .. Bollards not yet it ain't, your post is all about fiddling the numbers mate ..... Deposit contribution and discount combined or separate are one in the same thing, the new car is about 14 months away at least, got all these guff posts before when the facelift was introduced...... But ffs they weren't a year or so before the car was revealed
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
I only got a £700 contribution from Audi at 4 - 5 % Apr but l got a £5000 discount on top of the £700, larger deposit contributions = smaller discounts etc etc etc
 

DrEskimo

Registered User
Run out model .... .. Bollards not yet it ain't, your post is all about fiddling the numbers mate ..... Deposit contribution and discount combined or separate are one in the same thing, the new car is about 14 months away at least, got all these guff posts before when the facelift was introduced...... But ffs they weren't a year or so before the car was revealed

Precisely!
The question is whether levels of discounts will remain the same, or just be reduced in line with increase contributions? The total discount you get from brokers always includes the deposit contribution. Around 14% has been possible, but from doing some quick check online, it still seems to be around 14%...?

The fact that the discount is made up of a higher proportion of deposit contribution can be good though, as it helps with VT. Pretty sure deposit contributions count towards 'paid contributions', whereas discounts just lower the cost of the total amount payable. If I've understood it right, the net effect is that extra deposit contributions have a greater effect than discounted price when it comes to reaching the VT point.

I called my dealer this morning and it actually works out more expensive - it just looks good.

Yea, if overall level of discount is the same, then a change of 1.5% will add around £1,000 extra on a typically 48month deal, depending on the price, deposit and length of term of course. I imagine the GFV has been altered too though.

Bagging the discount then refinancing the PCP with a car loan may save some interest due on the monthly payments.

I think you are underestimating just how much interest you get charged on a PCP loan vs. a standard loan...it's not 'some' and there is no 'may' about it, It will absolutely save you money, and its typically thousands of pounds.

To give you an idea, I've looked at the finance details of a A3 SB 1.5TFSI S-Tronic Black Edition with no options, using the level of discount from Coast2Coast.

£5k down on a 36m/10k mile PCP deal, it will cost you £3,632 in interest charges.
£5k and a personal loan of the same amount over the same 36m period at 3% APR will cost you £974 in interest charges.

That's a saving of £2,658.

Even a personal loan at the same APR rate of 6.4% will be £2,080, still £1,552 cheaper.
(Comparing APR rates between different types of loans is pointless and tells you nothing about the amount of interest you are being charged. For perspective, for a personal loan to cost the same amount in interest as the PCP loan above, it would have to be charged at an APR of 11.2%.....)

However, with a PCP you can give the car back when 50% of the finance value is repayed. This gives you some protection from used car values dropping like a stone and putting your car into negative equity. VWFS have to take the car back and suck up the negative equity as per the PCP agreement

In the context of VT, you can VT when 50% of the total amount payable is paid. On the deal I've looked at, the total amount payable is around £32,470. So that means paying £16,235 before you can VT. With £5k down, the £2,780 deposit contribution, and monthlies of £276, this will occur around the 31month mark. By that stage, you would have paid ~£16,300. As you rightly say, you can now walk away.

Now the anticipated value at this point is around £15,500 using the GFV on the Audi calculator at 30months. So as above the car would have to be worth <£13,000 (not quite the full £2,658 saving, since you have saved on 5months interest in this scenario) before you start seeing any financial advantage from going PCP over personal loan route.

How likely is that...? When you consider that £13,000 is what it is currently predicted to be worth at 48months/40k miles, I would suggest quite slim...

Put it this way...if someone offered you a personal loan at 3% for the amount, and then said for £2,500 they would sell you a form of insurance that guarantees the value of the car of £15,500 at 32months and 20,000 miles, would you buy it...?

As ever, I think the protection in the form of a GFV and VT using a PCP are grossly over-estimated since they ignore the inordinately high interest costs that come with having one in the first place.

The 50% rule doesn't apply to car loans meaning you have no choice but to either pay the full term of the loan or find the short fall to clear the negative equity if you decide to sell early.

There will be no negative equity on a personal loan.
I'm almost certain that the amount of finance you owe on the loan will be lower than the value of the asset from about month 6 onwards, if not before (I cant get predicted values of the car from months 1-18).

Case in point, using the above example if you put £5k down and are paying £612 per month, by 12 months your settlement will be just £14,311. I think it's safe to say a 1yr old A3 will very obviously be worth more than that, considering that's less than the predicted value at the end of 36months/30k miles!
 

Chris43

Registered User
There will be no negative equity on a personal loan.

Your figures and logic make perfect sense. I agree if you pay the full term of a personal loan, there will be no negative equity but it may be the case if you wanted to get rid of the car before the end of the loan, I probably should have been more specific. I think the key factor in all of this is what do you want to with the car at the end of the PCP if you plan to keep it then a personal loan is definitely the way to go as you will have an asset at the end of it. If you've no plans to retain the car then PCP may still be the better option. Using my last car as an example:

Thanks to diesel gate, good lease deals and a face lift my Golf was worth around 2k less than the finance when I reached the VT point. I had 2 choices - continue throwing good money after bad and pay to the end of the PCP term and finish up with the little or no equity in the car when I came to trade it in. The other option was to VT and start again from scratch, pretty much the same financial situation I would have been in at the end of the PCP BUT saving the last remaining payments of the PCP agreement. You have to agree that VT and the ability to save the remaining PCP payments was the better decision, which goes back to my original comment that used values will take a hit when the new A3 hits the showrooms so the option to VT on a PCP does give some protection from negative equity.

I'm almost certain that the amount of finance you owe on the loan will be lower than the value of the asset from about month 6 onwards, if not before (I cant get predicted values of the car from months 1-18).

Its all down to the size of your monthly payment but needs to be fairly substantial on a short loan term to pay off the forward loading of the interest and the 20% loss of value from VAT when the car becomes 2nd hand.
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
Your figures and logic make perfect sense. I agree if you pay the full term of a personal loan, there will be no negative equity but it may be the case if you wanted to get rid of the car before the end of the loan, I probably should have been more specific. I think the key factor in all of this is what do you want to with the car at the end of the PCP if you plan to keep it then a personal loan is definitely the way to go as you will have an asset at the end of it. If you've no plans to retain the car then PCP may still be the better option. Using my last car as an example:

Thanks to diesel gate, good lease deals and a face lift my Golf was worth around 2k less than the finance when I reached the VT point. I had 2 choices - continue throwing good money after bad and pay to the end of the PCP term and finish up with the little or no equity in the car when I came to trade it in. The other option was to VT and start again from scratch, pretty much the same financial situation I would have been in at the end of the PCP BUT saving the last remaining payments of the PCP agreement. You have to agree that VT and the ability to save the remaining PCP payments was the better decision, which goes back to my original comment that used values will take a hit when the new A3 hits the showrooms so the option to VT on a PCP does give some protection from negative equity.



Its all down to the size of your monthly payment but needs to be fairly substantial on a short loan term to pay off the forward loading of the interest and the 20% loss of value from VAT when the car becomes 2nd hand.
The current car will not take a hit when the all new A3 hits showrooms, the new car will make used face lift cars look like bargains as the new car and its high RRP and nada discount will testify to this, it was the same when the face lift car was introduced, my pre face lift car didn't take a hit
 

wab172uk

Now in an X3 M40i And a Yaris GR-Four
Well Audi PCP contribution has gone up from £850 to £2780. Can it only get better as its now becoming a run out model with the 2019 model due out summer next year. Bag a bargain now or wait until the end of the year or early into next. Can the PCP contribution only get better along with discounts or is the drive the deal discount who only give you £1780 of the £2780 contribution the best it is likly to get at around und £5700 discount on and £31k car?

Think Audi now see the Mercedes A class as possible challange to A3 sales so are making the A3 look more attractive on finance.

I see that the contribution for the Saloon is less than the Sportback.

Wonder why that would be? Must be based on sales / deprecation?
 

wab172uk

Now in an X3 M40i And a Yaris GR-Four
The current car will not take a hit when the all new A3 hits showrooms, the new car will make used face lift cars look like bargains as the new car and its high RRP and nada discount will testify to this, it was the same when the face lift car was introduced, my pre face lift car didn't take a hit

Hate to think how much the all new S3 will be. Basic Saloon is now £38.8k. So new car is going to be over £40k
 
Precisely!
The question is whether levels of discounts will remain the same, or just be reduced in line with increase contributions? The total discount you get from brokers always includes the deposit contribution. Around 14% has been possible, but from doing some quick check online, it still seems to be around 14%...?

The fact that the discount is made up of a higher proportion of deposit contribution can be good though, as it helps with VT. Pretty sure deposit contributions count towards 'paid contributions', whereas discounts just lower the cost of the total amount payable. If I've understood it right, the net effect is that extra deposit contributions have a greater effect than discounted price when it comes to reaching the VT point.



Yea, if overall level of discount is the same, then a change of 1.5% will add around £1,000 extra on a typically 48month deal, depending on the price, deposit and length of term of course. I imagine the GFV has been altered too though.



I think you are underestimating just how much interest you get charged on a PCP loan vs. a standard loan...it's not 'some' and there is no 'may' about it, It will absolutely save you money, and its typically thousands of pounds.

To give you an idea, I've looked at the finance details of a A3 SB 1.5TFSI S-Tronic Black Edition with no options, using the level of discount from Coast2Coast.

£5k down on a 36m/10k mile PCP deal, it will cost you £3,632 in interest charges.
£5k and a personal loan of the same amount over the same 36m period at 3% APR will cost you £974 in interest charges.

That's a saving of £2,658.

Even a personal loan at the same APR rate of 6.4% will be £2,080, still £1,552 cheaper.
(Comparing APR rates between different types of loans is pointless and tells you nothing about the amount of interest you are being charged. For perspective, for a personal loan to cost the same amount in interest as the PCP loan above, it would have to be charged at an APR of 11.2%.....)



In the context of VT, you can VT when 50% of the total amount payable is paid. On the deal I've looked at, the total amount payable is around £32,470. So that means paying £16,235 before you can VT. With £5k down, the £2,780 deposit contribution, and monthlies of £276, this will occur around the 31month mark. By that stage, you would have paid ~£16,300. As you rightly say, you can now walk away.

Now the anticipated value at this point is around £15,500 using the GFV on the Audi calculator at 30months. So as above the car would have to be worth <£13,000 (not quite the full £2,658 saving, since you have saved on 5months interest in this scenario) before you start seeing any financial advantage from going PCP over personal loan route.

How likely is that...? When you consider that £13,000 is what it is currently predicted to be worth at 48months/40k miles, I would suggest quite slim...

Put it this way...if someone offered you a personal loan at 3% for the amount, and then said for £2,500 they would sell you a form of insurance that guarantees the value of the car of £15,500 at 32months and 20,000 miles, would you buy it...?

As ever, I think the protection in the form of a GFV and VT using a PCP are grossly over-estimated since they ignore the inordinately high interest costs that come with having one in the first place.



There will be no negative equity on a personal loan.
I'm almost certain that the amount of finance you owe on the loan will be lower than the value of the asset from about month 6 onwards, if not before (I cant get predicted values of the car from months 1-18).

Case in point, using the above example if you put £5k down and are paying £612 per month, by 12 months your settlement will be just £14,311. I think it's safe to say a 1yr old A3 will very obviously be worth more than that, considering that's less than the predicted value at the end of 36months/30k miles!

The advantage to the dealers of PCP is that buyers need a very little money up front, don't appreciate just how much interest they are paying or how much the car is really costing.
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
Hate to think how much the all new S3 will be. Basic Saloon is now £38.8k. So new car is going to be over £40k
Probably start at £41k or there abouts leaving the hatch just under £40k
 

DrEskimo

Registered User
Your figures and logic make perfect sense. I agree if you pay the full term of a personal loan, there will be no negative equity but it may be the case if you wanted to get rid of the car before the end of the loan, I probably should have been more specific.

Sorry, I still don't agree...! Apologies, I wasn't very clear in my explanation.

As they say, a picture paints a thousand words, so here is a quick graph to show you what happens on a personal loan and a PCP with regards to positive/negative equity.

40358159765_5e17bffaba.jpg


Sure it doesn't need explaining, but the orange line is the personal loan settlement figures at each time point, whilst the green line is the PCP settlement at each time point. The dashed black line is the estimated trade-in value of the A3 (educated guess at 6 and 12months, GFV set by Audi at 18,24,30 and 36m). If the settlement is above the dashed line (value), you are in negative equity (i.e. the settlement is greater than the value of the car), and if it's below the dashed line you are in positive equity.

As you can see, with £5k down, you are always in positive equity with a personal loan, however you are always in negative equity on the PCP (assuming these estimates of the trade in value are correct).

If you want more details on these figures just ping me a PM :)

Using my last car as an example:

Thanks to diesel gate, good lease deals and a face lift my Golf was worth around 2k less than the finance when I reached the VT point. I had 2 choices - continue throwing good money after bad and pay to the end of the PCP term and finish up with the little or no equity in the car when I came to trade it in. The other option was to VT and start again from scratch, pretty much the same financial situation I would have been in at the end of the PCP BUT saving the last remaining payments of the PCP agreement. You have to agree that VT and the ability to save the remaining PCP payments was the better decision, which goes back to my original comment that used values will take a hit when the new A3 hits the showrooms so the option to VT on a PCP does give some protection from negative equity.

Yea sure, but I still stand by the logic of my main argument.
How much did you pay in interest...? If you've paid £2,000 in interest charges by having a PCP, then you haven't saved anything....does that make sense? I would hazard a guess you probably ended paying far more than just £2,000 in interest charges, but would depend on the specifics of the deal.

Using a PCP to get the protection of the VT (or GFV) only has any economical advantage if the drop in value is greater than the interest charged, that's the point I'm trying to get across.
 

Chris43

Registered User
The current car will not take a hit when the all new A3 hits showrooms, the new car will make used face lift cars look like bargains as the new car and its high RRP and nada discount will testify to this, it was the same when the face lift car was introduced, my pre face lift car didn't take a hit

As new models are introduced its standard practice for dealers to lower the prices of the existing model to clear the cars out of the show room therefore the used prices take a similar reduction.
 

S32B

Registered User
That's so annoying, if only they had done that a little bit earlier... although it's at 6.4% whereas I'm sure mine is 4.5%
Don't lose much sleep over it mate, the rate on mine dropped before I collected it, they did the figures to see which was the best deal for me to use, it turned out that because the GFV had also dropped it was slightly more per month! They just switch which end they use!

All car makers are struggling to shift their cars hence increasing deposit contributions etc....some Mercedes models are running at nearly 20% discount if you look around.
@jassyo06 you know I have to get it in!!!! I got 21.4% off my A5 coupe :p average if I recall was about 17% :)
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
As new models are introduced its standard practice for dealers to lower the prices of the existing model to clear the cars out of the show room therefore the used prices take a similar reduction.
Yeah dealers will offer slightly larger discounts on certain models of the A3 and S3 but only at the death ie = even after the new car is introduced seen it, read it, done it, wore the t-shirt, 17% was the highest discount I've seen some member SAY they got on here,but you have to take most of what you see posted on here about discounts with a pinch of salt mate, the A3/S3 hold there value better than think they do
 

gazza53

Registered User
The current car will not take a hit when the all new A3 hits showrooms, the new car will make used face lift cars look like bargains as the new car and its high RRP and nada discount will testify to this, it was the same when the face lift car was introduced, my pre face lift car didn't take a hit
That's because the face lift was so subtle, change in head lights and bumpers nothing radical enough to really separate the two types or bother about like going from an iPhone 6 to a 6s. The new A3 will look different inside and out and will be on a new chassis with new engine line ups to match with partial hybridisation to improve fuel economy. Interior tech will match what's coming out now in the A8 etc and like it or not it will make the existing A3 look somewhat outdated but hey like laptops pointless spending extra money trying to future proof things which are changing quickly in the car industry.

Diesels were popular one minute gone the next and now the talk of an electric car revolution over the next 5 years with each model having a fully electric powered model variant. Think how the car designers can keep you buying into this all electric/electronic tech. Whereas a petrol engine was designed to power a range of models for several years to justify the design expense, a new electric motor could be launched every couple of years. What will all this do for vehicle minimum future values?
 

gazza53

Registered User
Sorry, I still don't agree...! Apologies, I wasn't very clear in my explanation.

As they say, a picture paints a thousand words, so here is a quick graph to show you what happens on a personal loan and a PCP with regards to positive/negative equity.

40358159765_5e17bffaba.jpg


Sure it doesn't need explaining, but the orange line is the personal loan settlement figures at each time point, whilst the green line is the PCP settlement at each time point. The dashed black line is the estimated trade-in value of the A3 (educated guess at 6 and 12months, GFV set by Audi at 18,24,30 and 36m). If the settlement is above the dashed line (value), you are in negative equity (i.e. the settlement is greater than the value of the car), and if it's below the dashed line you are in positive equity.

As you can see, with £5k down, you are always in positive equity with a personal loan, however you are always in negative equity on the PCP (assuming these estimates of the trade in value are correct).

If you want more details on these figures just ping me a PM :)



Yea sure, but I still stand by the logic of my main argument.
How much did you pay in interest...? If you've paid £2,000 in interest charges by having a PCP, then you haven't saved anything....does that make sense? I would hazard a guess you probably ended paying far more than just £2,000 in interest charges, but would depend on the specifics of the deal.

Using a PCP to get the protection of the VT (or GFV) only has any economical advantage if the drop in value is greater than the interest charged, that's the point I'm trying to get across.

So the best approach being take out a PCP and settle it within a week pay it off with a personal loan at 3% and you keep the £2780 Audi contribution. However I have since found Audi only pay £1780 towards this the dealer pays £1000 so the dealer just reduces the discount he will offer you by £1200 to recover the VAT as well. On a current A3 sportback black edition best discount I have on this PCP offer is £6015 on a 31k car up by £750 from the previous PCP £850 contribution. The dealer effectively just reduced the overall discount by £1200 in order to give the full £2780 PCP contribution. Still a good deal covers the VAT you lose when you drive the new car out the showroom but then it will look outdated in 14 months when the new model comes out.

These discounts are better than a Golf!
 

DrEskimo

Registered User
So the best approach being take out a PCP and settle it within a week pay it off with a personal loan at 3% and you keep the £2780 Audi contribution. However I have since found Audi only pay £1780 towards this the dealer pays £1000 so the dealer just reduces the discount he will offer you by £1200 to recover the VAT as well. On a current A3 sportback black edition best discount I have on this PCP offer is £6015 on a 31k car up by £750 from the previous PCP £850 contribution. The dealer effectively just reduced the overall discount by £1200 in order to give the full £2780 PCP contribution. Still a good deal covers the VAT you lose when you drive the new car out the showroom but then it will look outdated in 14 months when the new model comes out.

These discounts are better than a Golf!

There's a 67 plate at Leicester Audi for £22,750. Reckon £22k would buy it comfortably, so a £9k discount (31%).

Over three years ownership, taking into account buying an extended warranty for a few hundred to cover you those 6months your manufacturer warranty ends and the difference in depreciation, you could save around another £2/2.5k compared to buying a new one.
 

Chris43

Registered User
Diesels were popular one minute gone the next and now the talk of an electric car revolution over the next 5 years with each model having a fully electric powered model variant. Think how the car designers can keep you buying into this all electric/electronic tech. Whereas a petrol engine was designed to power a range of models for several years to justify the design expense, a new electric motor could be launched every couple of years. What will all this do for vehicle minimum future values?

Hybrids will become more common but I don't think the diesel engine is on its way out just yet. VW are planning a 1.5 diesel in the MK8 Golf that hits the UK in 2020

http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/volksw...wagen-golf-mk8-june-2019-production-confirmed
 

oli356

Registered User
I don't see how diesels could go.. What about the people that do high mileage....?
 

jassyo06

T-Cut King !
So the best approach being take out a PCP and settle it within a week pay it off with a personal loan at 3% and you keep the £2780 Audi contribution. However I have since found Audi only pay £1780 towards this the dealer pays £1000 so the dealer just reduces the discount he will offer you by £1200 to recover the VAT as well. On a current A3 sportback black edition best discount I have on this PCP offer is £6015 on a 31k car up by £750 from the previous PCP £850 contribution. The dealer effectively just reduced the overall discount by £1200 in order to give the full £2780 PCP contribution. Still a good deal covers the VAT you lose when you drive the new car out the showroom but then it will look outdated in 14 months when the new model comes out.

These discounts are better than a Golf!
Outdated.. . . What planet are you from mate= Audi don't design cars that differ much from old to new, new technology what will this be a touch screen instead of the current MMI dial .... New hybridisation = only in the performance versions go buy yer black edition with £6k off you'll not get a better deal than that... ... Or even better buy a golf. ... ..:bye:
 

gazza53

Registered User
There's a 67 plate at Leicester Audi for £22,750. Reckon £22k would buy it comfortably, so a £9k discount (31%).

Over three years ownership, taking into account buying an extended warranty for a few hundred to cover you those 6months your manufacturer warranty ends and the difference in depreciation, you could save around another £2/2.5k compared to buying a new one.
£25k new 1.5 black edition with comfort and sound pack, folding mirrors, rear armrest and throughloading plus reversing camera in metallic or pearl. Drive the deal only £500 more
 
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