2005 bkd what should I look out for and check?

Ben85

Registered User
My car is a 2005 bkd 140bhp. It's got 87,000 on the clock.

What should I look out for with this engine.

Does it have known faults and does it have a dpf?

I'm having it serviced along with gear box oil change in January so whilst it's on the ramps being worked on would like to know what I can check/clean/replace?

Cheers Ben
 

DJ_26

Registered User
My car is a 2005 bkd 140bhp. It's got 87,000 on the clock.

What should I look out for with this engine.

Does it have known faults and does it have a dpf?

I'm having it serviced along with gear box oil change in January so whilst it's on the ramps being worked on would like to know what I can check/clean/replace?

Cheers Ben

I've got a 2005 model too, so this should help you. Do you have a manual or DSG automatic?

No DPF on this engine. One less thing to go wrong! The head on this engine can be a problem area depending on the revision you have in your car. Revision A = Quite likely to crack. Rev. B = Better but may still crack. Rev. C= This one is a lot better and unlikely to crack. My car has a B revision head and so far no problems. It should only concern you, if you are losing a lot of coolant.

Turbos are known to **** themselves on these engines. Look for excessive oil leaks from the turbo (or any dodgy whistling/police siren sound). A little bit of oil isn't too bad, but a lot can indicate worn seals etc. Turbos are also known to get very dirty internally and the VNT mechanism gets stuck because of all the soot that ends up on the exhaust side, causing the overboost error and forcing the car into limp home mode (especially when putting the engine under high load, or going up hill). If caught early, you can clear this by going for a long spirited drive with some thrashing. If it happens frequently, you will need to have the turbo cleaned.

Listen for any chatter from the flywheel. Sometimes this can cause the whole car to shake a lot (as the springs inside the flywheel aren't damping the vibrations out any more because they are worn).

If your car has around 87k on the clock, it may be worth changing the cambelt, water pump and tensioners if not done so already. If you do decide to do the cambelt, make sure the timing is done correctly, otherwise it can affect the fuelling and you can have smoke problems. It's a good time to check the engine mounts for excessive movement (e.g. the dogbone mount). You can clean the EGR, but if it isn't causing you any problems then don't worry. Can always clean out the sections behind the wheel arch liners up front. These can harbour water, soil and other dirt, eventually causing the front wings to start rusting from inside out! I'm probably going to do this next year sometime.

There are many other faults I can list, but it all depends on your car really and what condition everything is in. I think 87k is in some ways quite young still for an 8P A3! Hope that's been useful.
 

Ben85

Registered User
Yeah that's great mate thank you.

Where is the code on the head so I can look?
The turbo does whistle a little, it's being carbon cleaned in the new year so see if that makes any difference.

With the clutch issue I've noticed when the cars cold it sometimes judders a little the first couple of times you pull away but once it's warm it's fine. Could that be the spring issue? And are the duel mass?
 

Nessy

VW + Audi mad
If you pull off the plastic cover that goes on top of the engine (that says 2.0 TDi) you will see 4 silver fuel lines that run parallel with the cylinder head.
IIRC if you look under the bottom pipe on the right hand side (when facing engine) you will see the part number of the cylinder head cast into the metal here.
The part number will end in A, B or C, denoting which revision cylinder head you have.
When you know where to look it takes just a few seconds to identify which head the engine has.
 

DJ_26

Registered User
I've had my '05 140 dsg for 6 years and my turbo has always had a slight siren sound. I can't see how you can have two fans revolving at around 100, 000 rpm NOT sound like that! Have you seen the insides of a siren?

https://www.thesirenboard.com/tech_howtheywork.html

Agreed, I probably should have went into more detail about that particular topic. I know some cars are totally fine, even with a little bit of a siren sound. But I've heard on here and other places, that there are some turbos that don't make that noise at all and then one day develop a huge siren noise before the turbo pops. Mine makes a scraping noise when you put a high load on the engine at low revs, as the turbine wheel scrapes against the housing, but it has done that for about 2 years, but still works well!
 

fangio

Registered User
I think that the cause of the sound that kills a turbo are whining bearings that have a small amount of wear, rather than the whistle of the blades. Probably caused by switching off before the blades have slowed to an idle after a blast. thereby starving the bearings of oil whilst still spinning at high revs.
 

DJ_26

Registered User
I think that the cause of the sound that kills a turbo are whining bearings that have a small amount of wear, rather than the whistle of the blades. Probably caused by switching off before the blades have slowed to an idle after a blast. thereby starving the bearings of oil whilst still spinning at high revs.

Yeah that sounds right too. Could the bearings be worn to a point that the shaft sort of becomes tilted slightly? Because mine only makes the noise when the engine is at low revs. above 2k rpm, there is no noise at all. I'm thinking it's something to do with the natural, heavy vibrations at lower rpm and the slightly play in shaft/bearings, that causes the contact and hence noise under those specific conditions. Good point about letting the turbo slow down at idle before switching off. No idea if the previous owners let that happen haha.

To the OP. As for the judder, I think more than one thing can cause that issue. There are some threads on here about clutch judder, have a search in the 8P section.
 

Rideen

Registered User
DJ_26's reply was pinpoint sharp regarding this matter. The only thing I would add is that it's worth checking the injectors. Not that common fault, but these can be tricky at times, get someone with VCDS to check fuel correction values for each injector.
 

FOURRINGS7

Registered User
I've got a BKD 2005 Passat.

Great car, but troublesome for me. I've changed the cam belt and water pump at 127k, previously done at 55k by someone.
Had a new egr fitted a month ago and the car drives sweet, I've realised by using EGR cleaner which goes straight in the fuel tank, kept mine running along for a long long time.

Also the turbo is a wreck of a problem, I've changed the turbo to a reconditioned item and realised I got same issues, but that's due to the fact that actuator keeps getting stuck. So instead of changing the turbo unit, by cleaning the wastegate actuator or replacing it, simply done the job.

I'm going to service the car myself, and now as mentioned earlier the Dual mass seems to be on its way out, definitely advise to change it as the later it's changed will only add more issues.

Other than that, despite these problems, the car keeps driving.
 

Ben85

Registered User
How can you tell the duel mass is failing? Is it like a normal clutch where it's slipping etc?
 

DJ_26

Registered User
How can you tell the duel mass is failing? Is it like a normal clutch where it's slipping etc?

On my car (DSG), the symptoms were typical dual mass flywheel chatter and a bit of shuddering from the engine at idle. Car still performed well, I thought. Mine never failed completely, we changed it in time. One thing I noticed straight after it was changed, was the actual torque getting to the ground. It's a bit hard to explain, it's like that new car torquey sensation (you get a sense that there is no play in the components). I think when the flywheel is worn, the energy put through it, causes that part of flywheel to rock back and forth violently, whereas with a new flywheel, the vibrations are dampened, this part doesn't rock so much and the energy is put through to the transmission, giving that sensation that the car is pulling a bit more responsively.
 

Ben85

Registered User
Ah right. Mines a manual and I have kind of he same things. The idle was lumpy but I stuck some redex in it and that seams to have stopped now but when the cars cold the first few times I pull away it judders. So I wonder if mines on its way out? It's on 87k as original clutch etc as far as I know.
 

Scweak

Registered User
I've just had my clutch and DMF changed at 148'000 miles. My clutch was worn, but not in a state that it had to be changed. My DMF pretty bad though and the guys who did it had to angle grind it off.

The main thing I noticed was the noise when starting the car from cold. It would clatter/rattle pretty loud (especially when standing outside the car) until the clutch was pressed. Since having it changed, that's stopped and there is now a lot less vibration in the car. Having come from a Peugeot 206, the vibration didn't really stand out to me too much until it was changed.

Also when on the motorway around 60-80 if I was in 5th or 6th and tried to accelerate it would make a pretty loud noise. It sounded kind of like a really loud exhausts crossed with metal hitting metal.

I am by no means a mechanic in any sense, but hopefully that helps a bit. If nothing else, take it to a garage and ask them to check it ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

Rideen

Registered User
Most reliable way of checking for a bad DMF is to press the clutch pedal just so slightly and if you can feel the shaking it's on it's way out. At least that's what 3 mechanics told me.
 
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