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What brand of disc????

Discussion in 'Handling' started by dreddg, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. dreddg
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    dreddg Member

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    [Mar 23, 2006]
    Hi all

    I am after peoples opinions and expertise in choosing my next set of discs & pads !!!!!

    I know that drilled and grooved is the way...but there are so many companies saying their discs are better /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/noidea.gif

    So please fellow ASn ers can any of you help be it EBC, Black diamond Tar-Ox I am starting to feel giddy looking at all their websites /ubbthreads/images/graemlins/vomit.gif
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  3. dummi
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    dummi smoking a6

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    [Mar 23, 2006]
    if your going for drilled go for ones that have been strengthened at those points, i went for just grooved to avoid that hassle, sorry can't be more help with names
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  4. JayB5UK
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    JayB5UK Member

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    [Mar 23, 2006]
    I went for a combo from German & Swedish and they're very good and the price was excellent too.

    Zimmerman (German made) cross drilled discs & Pagid fast-road pads all for £125 delivered. It can't be beaten, or couldn't when I got them!

    For a fast-road pad they surprised me by being responsive from cold too. Some are a bit ropey until hot, but these are great, lots of feel too.
    #3
  5. Mo-S3
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    Mo-S3 Member

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    [Mar 23, 2006]
    better to stay away from drilled discs, they are very prone to cracking around the holes and to be honest are quite pointless for road use. Purely asthetic reasons i say. Stick to the grooved ones or standard plain ones.
    #4
  6. Ess_Three
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    Ess_Three Active Member

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    [Mar 23, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]
    better to stay away from drilled discs, they are very prone to cracking around the holes and to be honest are quite pointless for road use. Purely asthetic reasons i say. Stick to the grooved ones or standard plain ones.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Good advice...Black Diamond grooved are very good...I run the S3 sized discs on my Golf GTI...they are good.

    I wouldn't run Black Diamond Predator pads though....they are ****. No feel...
    #5
  7. JayB5UK
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    JayB5UK Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]
    better to stay away from drilled discs, they are very prone to cracking around the holes and to be honest are quite pointless for road use. Purely asthetic reasons i say. Stick to the grooved ones or standard plain ones.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Ok then, someone better tell the Porsche engineers then cause the last new 911 I was looking at had these front and rear standard.

    I mean, come on, on our types of cars drilled, grooved, they're all a bit pointless really considering the speed limit - unless you're doing track days and stuff.
    I just went for cross-drilled because I thought they'd keep the heat down a bit if I am being a bit lairy and using the brakes heavily and frequently, there's a lot of good back roads near me with fast straights and then dodgy hairpins at the ends, standard set up used to get a bit scary!

    You pays your money and takes your choice at the end of the day.
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  8. madvw
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    madvw Active Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    I suppose you must weigh up the pro's and cons of having drilled discs for road use:

    Pros:
    better exteme braking
    better heat dissipation after extreme braking
    Usually lighter than plain/drilled

    Cons:
    Cost
    No-better braking under normal road conditions
    Risk of cracking/warping due to not cooling down properly.
    Risk of shattering a disc and not having a run-off to safely stop in.


    As for porsches, i guess the same as above applies as well, just they can't really go selling a 500bhp car with solid discs. Plus the fact that i'd hope that most porsche drivers know how to cool down their cars components after a hard drive anyway.
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  9. JayB5UK
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    JayB5UK Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    Yeah I agree with the cooling side of things, but I guess most of us are mature enough to slow down a bit before we get to our destination, more likely for the life of our turbo's than the brakes, but they 'd have to be pretty substandard, or hammered all the time, or old to crack form road driving I would say. The ones I bought are German and so have passed TUV testing, which will do me.
    One annoying thing with drilled though is that they can clog up with pad debris and need the odd poke through with something!
    I am also a biker as well as a car nut and every bike these days and for god knows how long up until now has drilled discs too. Never had any cracks or wear on them and thats giving them some serious stick stopping from 160 or so!
    #8
  10. dreddg
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    dreddg Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    Right so if I have got this right stick with grooved discs only and dont bother with drilled.........pad wise it seems Pagid come highly recommended talking to local mechanic who "swears by them"

    So if I am going with grooved discs( I dont do track days, so leave the drilled alone) EBC or black Diamond????? and is it worth going with the larger size disc mine are 288 (i think) and go with the 312???
    #9
  11. Ess_Three
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    Ess_Three Active Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]

    Ok then, someone better tell the Porsche engineers then cause the last new 911 I was looking at had these front and rear standard.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Yes, I know. I've got one.

    But Porsches discs are cast with holes in them...and strong points cast in around the drillings.
    And they still crack...mine are.

    Better with slotted...


    [ QUOTE ]

    I mean, come on, on our types of cars drilled, grooved, they're all a bit pointless really considering the speed limit - unless you're doing track days and stuff.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Rubbish!
    If you understand what the drilling or slotting does...you'll know they work.
    As long as you use the brakes hard, they serve a purpose.


    [ QUOTE ]

    I just went for cross-drilled because I thought they'd keep the heat down a bit if I am being a bit lairy and using the brakes heavily and frequently,


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Cross drilling does nothnig to keep the discs cool...nothing at all.
    The drillings (or slottings) are there to let the hot layer of gas escape. The hot gas builds up as you brake hard...causing fade.


    [ QUOTE ]

    You pays your money and takes your choice at the end of the day.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    You do...but please understand the principle behind the slitting or drilling...and understand that cheap cross-drilled discs WILL crack...they always do. Even Porsche discs...

    Do you know that upgrades for 911s use slotted discs?
    Why do you think that it?
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  12. Ess_Three
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    Ess_Three Active Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]
    I suppose you must weigh up the pro's and cons of having drilled discs for road use:

    Pros:
    better exteme braking
    better heat dissipation after extreme braking
    Usually lighter than plain/drilled


    [/ QUOTE ]

    I'd have to dissagree...
    I don't think the heast dissipation is any better...it gets rid of the hot gas layer...but doesn't cool the disc any more...you need dedicated brake cooling for that.


    [ QUOTE ]

    Cons:
    Cost
    No-better braking under normal road conditions


    [/ QUOTE ]

    I guess this depends on how you class normal braking... use my brakes hard, all the time. Short push, but big effort.
    Cross drilling does help here..back to the gas layer again.


    [ QUOTE ]

    Risk of cracking/warping due to not cooling down properly.
    Risk of shattering a disc and not having a run-off to safely stop in.


    [/ QUOTE ]

    Valid points..


    [ QUOTE ]

    As for porsches, i guess the same as above applies as well, just they can't really go selling a 500bhp car with solid discs. Plus the fact that i'd hope that most porsche drivers know how to cool down their cars components after a hard drive anyway.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Again, I think you'll find that with Porsche's excellent choice of pad material, the cross drilling is to rid the gas that forms.
    I can confirm that over 18 laps of the Nurburgring in 35+ degree heat, mt standard Porsche pads and cross drilled discs held up well.
    There is some surface cracking though...

    Don't forget also, Porsche engineer in brake cooling to their cars...Audi don't!
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  13. Ess_Three
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    Ess_Three Active Member

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    [Mar 24, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]
    I am also a biker as well as a car nut and every bike these days and for god knows how long up until now has drilled discs too. Never had any cracks or wear on them and thats giving them some serious stick stopping from 160 or so!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Funny that my 320mm upgrade on my Fireblade had grooved discs eh?

    Bikes don't have to dissipate the same energy...hence the lack of cracking.
    #12
  14. god_thats_quick
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    god_thats_quick Numptie of the highest order

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    [Mar 25, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]
    [ QUOTE ]
    I am also a biker as well as a car nut and every bike these days and for god knows how long up until now has drilled discs too. Never had any cracks or wear on them and thats giving them some serious stick stopping from 160 or so!

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Funny that my 320mm upgrade on my Fireblade had grooved discs eh?

    Bikes don't have to dissipate the same energy...hence the lack of cracking.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    I assumed bikes had less problems with using drilled discs because they are not normally vented so when cooling down they won't shrink and crack in the same way as it's just like sheet of metal - but as I'm a bit drunk and more than a little clueless to start with who knows.
    #13
  15. Ess_Three
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    Ess_Three Active Member

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    [Mar 25, 2006]
    [ QUOTE ]

    I assumed bikes had less problems with using drilled discs because they are not normally vented so when cooling down they won't shrink and crack in the same way as it's just like sheet of metal - but as I'm a bit drunk and more than a little clueless to start with who knows.

    [/ QUOTE ]

    That's no doubt a factor...
    Bikes also tend to use stainless steel for the brake discs...and thier rotors tend to be fully floating.

    My upgraded rotors were ductile iron, on ergal carriers...with 6 pot callipers.
    But they were plain faced rotors with a few grooves in them...and used to rettle like hell in the carriers.

    Same with a few of the upgrades out there..

    So, there must be some advantage there, or why not keep them drilled?
    #14

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