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Risk of keeping current car??

sebtomato Jun 11, 2013

  1. sebtomato

    sebtomato Member

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    Hi,

    I currently own, as a private car, an Audi A3 2.0 TDI S-tronic. I bought it 4.5 years ago (new), and it has around 40,000 miles.

    The car is in perfect condition, and had all services done by Audi.

    However, I am wondering if there are some risks in keeping that car longer, given the turbo and the S-tronic gearbox, as opposed to getting a new car (I am not particularly keen on the new A3).

    My understanding is that a failure of the turbo or the gearbox/mechatronic unit would be expensive, seem to be quite frequent on older Audi cars.

    I am wondering if Audi UK would pay for some of the repair if the car had a fairly low mileage and full Audi service, as those parts would be expected to last a long time.

    I like my current car, but I am wondering if keeping the car could become very expensive.

    Thanks,
    Seb
     
  2. Minstadave

    Minstadave Member

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    You're worried at 40k?!?

    I've got a 2.0T DSG on 97k and its still perfect. The petrols seem to chew through less turbos but I still wouldn't worry at all.

    Even worst case scenario you turbo and dsg dies, it's still going to cost less than the depreciation in the first year of owning a new car.
     
  3. sebtomato

    sebtomato Member

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    Thanks. I was told that an entire DSG gearbox is £5,000 and a turbo probably a lot too. I guess there is also the DPF filter to replace at some point too.

    I know someone who has a Golf, and the turbo broke, created an oil leak and broke most of the engine at the same time. The engine had to be replaced. VW took care of half of the cost, even though the car was 5 years old, since it was clearly a fault in the part and the car had been serviced properly. I don't know if Audi would do the same for a DSG gearbox breaking down early.

    Basically, I am getting a car allowance from my employer, which covers currently the cost of my current car (normal maintenance and parts, insurance, depreciation etc). Alternatively, I could get a company car (new Audi A3) costing me about £100 per month more (including company car tax).

    Therefore, over the next three years, I will save about £3,600 keeping my current car, so am I likely to spend more in exceptional repairs?? I am happy to keep my current car for another two to three years, but need to make sure it is a sound financial decision.

    I don't know if the Sale of Goods Act would apply, since it states that a product should last a "reasonable" time. For a diesel car well maintained, that would be at least 10 years for the major parts.
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2013
  4. J8TT X

    J8TT X Member

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    If your happy with your current car and saving £3600 then I would say keep it.
    If the cars in perfect condition then I would expect it to stay like that for another couple of years.

    I'm on 130k in my 2.0 TDi, I've had the turbo re-conditioned and a few general wear tear issues. cost me £1500 in 3years.

    Your cars nearly 5yrs old so I would get a full service (cambelt, water pump, oil & filter, DSG oil & filter, etc)
    It should keep your car running sweet.
     
  5. Graham89

    Graham89 Derv Perv

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    40k wow that's low for 4.5 years. I'm on 143k miles now but it is an 05 plate to be fair. No problems this end. I have had turbo replaced at 100k but was no more than £1k local VAG specialist.
     
  6. c_w

    c_w Well-Known Member

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    There are things you can do to look after the turbo yourself to increase it beyond the laughable 100k lifetime most people accept. Change the oil at half the interval AUDI suggest (I change mine every 6months, so about 6k miles = £33 per change doing it myself). Warm the car up gently and if it's hot or just been thrashed let it idle for a minute or two to cool down before shutting down.
     

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