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Engine Fan Drained My Battery :(

Discussion in 'A3/S3/Sportback (8P Chassis)' started by Wai-Fan, Dec 13, 2010.

  1. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Well my engine fan has been running all night and has drained my battery. As this is a common problem, just want to ask what to do next.

    I've called the AA and they will be coming round later to take a look and maybe tow it to Audi.

    I had a look through some posts and prices for a new fan is between £400 - £500, is this correct???

    Thanks.
     
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  3. S3Alex

    S3Alex Rarely neutral
    Team Ibis Audi S3

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    If there's even a shred of a warranty,take it back and complain.Even if there isn't,take it back and complain...it's such a well known fault,and I had exactly the same on my A3 3.2 a few years ago,so it's not a new fault either.
     
  4. aragorn

    aragorn "Stick a V8 in it!"
    Staff Member Moderator VCDS Map User

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    Its not the fan itself, its the fan controller.

    Little box of electronics bolted to the frame rails somewhere around the front end.
     
  5. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    My car is 1 and a half years out of warranty, so I doubt they'll help me out. I will mention that it's a common fault to them and see what they say.

    I see, is this an expensive fix???

    I wish I didn't waste my money on an after market warranty last year!
     
  6. aragorn

    aragorn "Stick a V8 in it!"
    Staff Member Moderator VCDS Map User

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    having said the above, it seems 8P's might have said controller built into the larger of the two fans.
     
  7. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Searched on google and had a look at another forum and seems the fans and the module are indeed one unit. Sat in audi now and they have no courtesy cars till after Xmas :(. Ah wells not looking forward to the bill!
     
  8. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Audi has had my car for a couple of days now. They have quoted me £940 for the repair!

    What needs doing is:

    1: New engine coolant fan.
    2: Wiring repair.
    3. New battery.

    Or £751 without the battery.

    After having the car only 2 and a half years and bought through their Audi Approved Used scheme, do I have the right to complain to them about this fault as it is a common problem?

    Also I don't know anything about the batteries in cars, what should I be looking for when buying a battery???

    Thanks.
     
    #7 Wai-Fan, Dec 16, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2010
  9. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Update:

    Rang the parts department at Leeds Audi and they quoted me £201.96+VAT for an engine coolant fan and £99.85+VAT for a new battery. As the rest is reparing the wiring and installing the new parts, it seems a bit steep! I have also emailed Audi UK about this coolant fan issue, so hopefully be receiving a response soon.
     
  10. Scott

    Scott Well-Known Member

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    Get it towed to an independent!
     
  11. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Rang around a few places and all of them said they'll ring me back after they get some prices. But only one place rang me back! It's going to be hard for them to quote me for the wiring repair as they need to see it first.
     
  12. consilio

    consilio Up the owls!

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    It might be worth having a look at the Sales of Goods Act.

    If your car is not too old and you can demonstrate that this appears to be a common manufacturing defect, then you should be able to get the repair done for nothing.
    Key Facts:

    • Wherever goods are bought they must "conform to contract". This means they must be as described, fit for purpose and of satisfactory quality (i.e. not inherently faulty at the time of sale).
    • Goods are of satisfactory quality if they reach the standard that a reasonable person would regard as satisfactory, taking into account the price and any description.
    • Aspects of quality include fitness for purpose, freedom from minor defects, appearance and finish, durability and safety.
    • It is the seller, not the manufacturer, who is responsible if goods do not conform to contract.
    • If goods do not conform to contract at the time of sale, purchasers can request their money back "within a reasonable time". (This is not defined and will depend on circumstances)
    • For up to six years after purchase (five years from discovery in Scotland) purchasers can demand damages (which a court would equate to the cost of a repair or replacement).
    • A purchaser who is a consumer, i.e. is not buying in the course of a business, can alternatively request a repair or replacement.
    • If repair and replacement are not possible or too costly, then the consumer can seek a partial refund, if they have had some benefit from the good, or a full refund if the fault/s have meant they have enjoyed no benefit
    • In general, the onus is on all purchasers to prove the goods did not conform to contract (e.g. was inherently faulty) and should have reasonably lasted until this point in time (i.e. perishable goods do not last for six years).
    • If a consumer chooses to request a repair or replacement, then for the first six months after purchase it will be for the retailer to prove the goods did conform to contract (e.g. were not inherently faulty)
    • After six months and until the end of the six years, it is for the consumer to prove the lack of conformity.
     
  13. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Thank you! I never really paid much attention to the Sales of Goods Act.

    I did have a problem when I first bought the car and have had several problems after. Thinking back, I really should've just rejected it. I have sent an email to Audi about my ownership experience the other day, waiting for a reply to see what they say.

    I am writing to you in regards to my Audi ownership experience.

    Ever since the first day I purchased the car two and half years ago, I have had problem after problem that keeps appearing. The first issue was within the first few weeks of ownership in which I believed I was practically duped into paying over the odds for my car. However, this problem was rectified by you and Leeds Audi which I have been very pleased with.

    On the other hand, my satisfaction quickly deteriorated after other problems occurred. The next problem arose within the first week was also that the CD player in the car had a malfunction in which a few of the controls did not function. It was replaced under warranty, within another couple of months, another fault with the CD player and glovebox also appeared, but was fixed under warranty. These were minor problems and did not bother me too much apart from the inconvenience of not having a car for a day.

    Also when I bought the car, it did not come with a second key and the salesman said he would sort this out for me. A couple of months later and after several phone calls I still did not have my second key. It was only after a couple of weeks of no contact from the salesman did I personally go into the dealership to ask for the key, in which they told me the salesmen who sold me the car no longer works there. Furthermore, I was told the salesman who sold me the car did not even arrange for another key to be given to me.


    Just when I thought my problems were over, on the eighth month of ownership, the car failed its MOT, quite surprising for a car which was sold under the Audi Approved Used car scheme. As the items that needed replacing were brake discs and pads, I knew they would not be covered under warranty, so I had to pay for them to be replaced. But I was surprised and dissatisfied that the car was sold on with brakes in a condition which would not even last a year.


    As the first year of ownership approached, yet again another problem arose. The engine management light appeared and the air conditioning system ceased to function, the car was booked for a repair a day before my warranty expired, which was another inconvenience as I was left without a car.

    Now I am experiencing another problem with my engine coolant fan which has currently left my car inoperable and is awaiting repair at Leeds Audi. As far as I am aware, after being part of an Audi owner’s forum for the past couple of years, it seems this is a common problem.


    The point of this letter is for me to ask two questions:

    1. How did a car such as mine even manage to make it through your Audi Approved used car checks? You could argue that I have not been taking care of the car very well, but I have always taken it to an Audi dealership for servicing and any work it requires. Plus, the oil is checked once a month and topped up to recommended levels.

    2. Why has there been no recalls on a defective part such as the engine coolant fan? I am sure someone at Audi must be aware of the engine coolant fan problem as it seems quite common.

    As you can see, my ownership experience has been disappointing from the onset. I have not mentioned this to anyone at Audi as I really tried to believe I have bought a premium quality product with a customer service to match. I do not expect anything to be perfect, but this is not satisfactory.

    Thank you very much for your time and I look forward to your response.

    My writing skills aren't too great, so I hope I got my point across. I sent this on thursday and awaiting a reply.
     
  14. Wai-Fan

    Wai-Fan Member

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    Update:

    Finally got my car fixed!

    Went to IVC in Leeds and they did the work for £450 inc recovery.

    They replaced the cooling fan and that was it, no new battery required or any wiring repairs. Turned out a connector got wet and rusted!
     
  15. flying oyster

    flying oyster flying oyster

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    at least thats a better price still poxy luck there seems to be always something on mine new clutch flywheel rear windscreen wiper and now the turbos sticky i suppose ive got the cracked head and the fan to go on mine yet grrrr
     

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