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changing only 2 tyres?

Discussion in 'Handling' started by skanky, Aug 9, 2006.

  1. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 9, 2006]
    i'm currently running on a set of 205/55/16 pirelli p6000's on a 1999 A3 1.8t sport (fwd) and the right rear seems to lose pressure rather quicker than the other suggesting possibly a slow puncture of some sort.

    i inflated all 4 tyres to 34psi, did about 250miles in 2 weeks including some motorway driving and country lane fun, i check them again at the petrol station (it has a digital readout for the tyre pressure) the other 3 are in the region of 30-32psi and the right-rear is down to 24psi!

    would it be better to:
    - take it to a garage and have them look at the right-rear tyre, sounds like a slow puncture and hope they can repair it
    - replace the front 2 with goodyear f1's and move the front 2 tyres to the rear and use the left-rear as a spare (i think i have a space saver atm) and ditch the right rear.

    taking it to a garage and if they can fix it, would be cheaper than getting 2 new 16" f1's (£160 fitted), i hope.

    however im still using 16" alloys and eventually i would want to upgrade to a set of 17" s3 alloys with f1's, which would mean getting a new set at a cost of around £400 on top of the cost of the s3 alloys.

    problem is i cant afford to pony up the cash to get the s3 alloys+f1s as its just too much for me to afford at the moment. also it pushes up my insurance a little for having non standard alloys (im with bell).

    i cant really wait and save up because its a bit dangerous driving around like this.

    all of the tyres have a good 4-5mm of tread left so im loath to replace them all whilst they're still "road legal."

    im going to ask at the garage just down the road from me tomorrow, if he can check/fix the right rear for a slow puncture, but if i went for the f1's on the front, would that affect handling in any way bearing in mind i would have slightly worn p6000's on the rears?
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  3. icenutter
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    icenutter Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    If there is nothing obvious wrong with the tyre (ie no nails in it :wink:) then a garage will normally try to fix a slow puncture by replacing the valve and re-seating the tyre. This is defiantely the cheapest option. I'd expect to pay £10-15 or something.

    Re mixing tyre types. In an ideal world having the same tyres all round is best. But when money is a deciding factor its not the end of the world. It would affect the handling though, probably a bit more slidey at the rear i'd guess - but that might be a good thing :ninja:
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  4. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    asked at the garage this morning, £12.50 to try and fix it.

    i think i'll go for that before thinking of getting 2 new f1's for the fronts and fitting the best 2 p6000s to the rears.
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  5. fingermouse
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    fingermouse thats me

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    on fwd cars always put your best tyres on the rear not the front
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  6. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    really? i always thought with the front wheels having to do the steering work, getting grippy tyres there would be better.
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  7. bantam1
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    bantam1 Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    skanky you have PM
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  8. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    PM'd you back..
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  9. icenutter
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    icenutter Member

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    [Aug 10, 2006]
    Yea, on the good tyre front/rear thing it tells you about it here
    http://http://www.michelin.co.uk/uk/auto/auto_cons_bib_pqr_neuf.jsp
    But I don't really buy it. A FWD front engined car will always want to understeer. Less grip at the front compared to the rear amplifies this.

    On that michelin website it says that 'On a slippery road, the rear will lose traction before the front of the vehicle. The driver will have no chance of controlling the rear, and will be tempted to accelerate further, which will amplify the spin effect. Only an experienced driver will be able to recover from this dangerous situation...acceleration when cornering induces understeer, which counteracts rear wheel oversteer. '

    1)Surely you are best placed to decide whether you are an experienced driver or not.
    2)Mild oversteer is best cured by acceleration or turning into the slide
    3)If the front tyres are doing all the controlling of the car then surely they are most important
    4)A major front-end slide could be just as dangerous as a rear-end one.
    5)One of the ways to make a fwd car turn in is to have the rear-end stiffer than the front. As the car turns in the stiffer rear end causes more load transfer to the outer wheel which has the net effect of reducing grip at the rear. You then have relatively more grip at the front which then conteracts a fwd front engined cars tendency to understeer. This is why some people fit stiffer ARBs to their S3s by the way.

    I think its one of those things like being taught not to cross your hands over the wheel; its fine for driving normally, but if you are trying to catch some oversteer or driving on a track then you simply can't steer fast enough that way.

    Advice is always tailored to the lowest denominator...

    I'd advise you to follow michelin's advice, but I know what i'd do :wink:
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  10. cheesy
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    cheesy New Member

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    [Aug 29, 2006]
    Speaking from experience,put best tires on the rear, on all my cars if you are mid corner, with foot just keeping the power on, the rear will always kick out, leading to some scary FWD drifting moment, not fun, especially if not expected.
    :wtf:
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  11. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 29, 2006]
    at the moment, i have the "better" tread tyres on the rear.

    just thinking to when the fronts will need next replacing, the rears wont be as worn and will need to switch the rears to the front and the new tyres on the rears.

    will i need all 4 wheels re-balanced when moving used rears to the front to accomodate new set of tyres?
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  12. icenutter
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    icenutter Member

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    [Aug 30, 2006]
    As a rule of thumb, tyres only need balancing when they are put on the rim. So no. But if you are feeling rich it won't do any harm.
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  13. skanky
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    skanky Member

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    [Aug 30, 2006]
    never feeling rich :) so if i got the tyres already fitted onto alloys, then they wont need rebalanced then?

    even when taking them from one car and putting them onto another?
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  14. icenutter
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    icenutter Member

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    [Aug 30, 2006]
    In theory, they don't need doing. But, just to cover my arse, the weights could get knocked/rim could get dinged/hubs might be different etc etc. Its normally obvious when a tyre needs doing anyway so just swap them and see.
    #13
  15. Damian s
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    Damian s New Member

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    [Oct 12, 2006]
    Aside from the odd tyre which seems to be going down, when did you check tyre pressures?

    Remember the hotter the tyre the higher the pressure, unless you have the nitrogen filled! so if you checked them hot the first time and colder the second then you would see a difference in tyre pressures all round.
    #14

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