1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Boot release pad replacement - parts & photos

The Doctor Dec 31, 2015

  1. The Doctor

    The Doctor Well-Known Member

    1,394
    189
    63
    I know there are various threads on this already, but I had to search through several to find the right part numbers, and some refer to replacement of the boot release switch mechanism itself rather than the boot release pads & connections.

    So, if your boot release pads are no longer working, here's what you need to do. The cause is most likely water ingress to the electrical connectors for the pads, which will need to be replaced. Part numbers and photos of the bits you will need are shown at the end of the thread.

    First you need to remove the inner plastic liner from the boot panel. To do this, first remove the 2 screws from the pull handle and remove the handle moulding itself. Then, starting from the boot catch area, you will need to pull HARD to release the plastic liner from the boot panel, working your way round as you do so. It's easiest to start to ease it away on one side of the catch, then the other, and keep doing so until it comes free with a BANG! Don't worry - the clips are all metal so there should be no risk of snapping anything.

    (Whilst you're in there, check that the rear wiper water hose connection is not leaking, as this can cause other problems that are the subject of other threads on here).

    Once done, unhook the metal rod that connects the boot lock to the boot catch mechanism. It is attached to the boot catch by a little white plastic clip which you can unclip with a flat blade screwdriver to free the rod.

    Then, disconnect the small electrical connectors from the number plate lights by gently levering them free with a flat blade screwdriver on the metal portion of the connector:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Next, disconnect the larger connectors and the 2 brown connectors that go into the back of the boot release pads. NOTE - the brown connectors will probably be badly corroded due to water ingress and so will most likely not disconnect easily. Don't worry about this - just snip the wires close to the connector itself because you will be replacing them with new parts. As you can see, this had happened to mine:

    [​IMG]

    Next, undo the 2 x 10mm bolts that hold the boot lock in place. Remove the boot lock and set aside.

    Finally, remove the 2 x 10mm nuts that hold the boot lock trim panel in place, being careful to hold it with the other hand to avoid it falling and getting damaged.

    This will then allow you to un-clip the old boot release pad holders from the trim panel.

    In my case, water had also found its way into the pad itself, although the little switch inside was not affected:

    [​IMG]

    I took the opportunity to clean up the area behind the trim panel whilst it was off:

    [​IMG]

    I noticed that there was some minor corrosion starting around the area where the boot release pad holders mount, which I will treat with Bilt Hamber Hydrate 80 and top-coat before fitting the new parts:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The new parts you will need are as follows:

    8D0 827 565D (LHS switch) £26.11+ VAT
    8D0 827 566D (RHS switch) £26.11 + VAT

    [​IMG]

    8D0 827 359A (Gasket) x2 £3.17 + VAT each!

    [​IMG]

    000 979 018EA (wires/connectors) x2 £5.31 + VAT each!
    (these need to be cut to leave 4 wires with 1 connector at the end of each, and soldered to the original wires in the car).

    [​IMG]

    8D0 972 623AA (Housing) x2 £5.63 + VAT each!

    [​IMG]

    Not the cheapest parts known to man, but at least I'm satisfied that they're all genuine VAG bits.

    I'll finish off the thread when I fit the parts in the next few days.
     
    Last edited: Dec 31, 2015
    jojo, S3 Hilife and s3mad_dude like this.
  2. The Doctor

    The Doctor Well-Known Member

    1,394
    189
    63
    Made a bit more progress this morning.

    New connectors assembled:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Soldered onto the wires from the old corroded connectors. This was a pain because you're essentially soldering upside-down, so you can see how I did this by temporarily attaching a length of wood to the inside of the boot using a couple of zip ties, to use as a surface to solder on. (You can see where I've previously fixed the leaky rear washer).

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Testing, testing - they work again!

    [​IMG]

    So now I just need to treat the small amount of corrosion around the pad mounting holes and re-fit the switches and inner boot panel.
     
    jojo, Gmac, s3mad_dude and 1 other person like this.
  3. Ashy>>

    Ashy>> Member

    50
    10
    8
    Great write up mate
     
  4. IanPG

    IanPG Well-Known Member Team Nogaro Blue Silver Supporter Audi S3

    1,389
    551
    113
    Good job!!!
     
  5. jojo

    jojo Looking for Boost! Staff Member Moderator Team Daytona Audi S3 quattro Audi A6 Audi Avant Owner Group

    29,001
    3,657
    113
    Nice work Paul, added into the FAQs! :)
     

Share This Page