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Bird poop damage...?

Discussion in 'Detailing - Sponsored by Slim's Detailing' started by A3-sport, Jun 15, 2009.

  1. A3-sport

    A3-sport BOSE

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    Is it possible to correct acid staining or whatever its called from bird poop?

    The previous owner obviously didnt give a **** about it because there are big plop marks all over the paintwork.

    Just going through the processes of claying the car over the next few days and it seems to stand out more.

    Can anyone tell me if this is correct-able or any help at all would be great.

    Thanks.
     
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  3. Caesium

    Caesium My BM is fixed!
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    They should polish out, depending on how bad they are, I managed to polish an almighty sun-baked **** off my carbon black car, just go careful with the polish(er)
     
  4. A3-sport

    A3-sport BOSE

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    I have tried all my products (except t-cut or paint restorer) on them and they havent shifted. Ive even clayed them and that didnt work!
     
  5. Caesium

    Caesium My BM is fixed!
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    Clay wont remove it, you'll need some light cutting compound.
     
  6. A3-sport

    A3-sport BOSE

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    Tcut or AG paint restorer??
     
  7. WX51TXR

    WX51TXR Polished Bliss

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    T-Cut is pants and usually does more harm than good, while the AG product will likely not have enough cut. The safest appraoch by hand would be to use Menzerna 203S, applied using a Lake Country German CCS Light Cut Pad (the pad choice is critical, as you need a firm foam to work and breakdown the abrasives properly). If this fails to work, a machine polisher will be required, and at this point even stronger abrasives could safely be used. The etching caused by uric acid in bird's mess varies greatly in terms of severity, and is sometimes fully correctable with little effort, while at other times the damage can fully penetrate the clearcoat, meaning nothing will fix it (other than a respray of the affected area). There is no way to tell this before you start the corrective polishing process, so it's a case of simply trying and seeing if an improvment can be made. :icon_thumright:
     

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