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Bad Haze

Discussion in 'Detailing - Sponsored by Slim's Detailing' started by joe_echo, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. joe_echo

    joe_echo Member

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    I have recently bought a 2000 A3 Tdi 1.9 in cactus green, on the bonnet is some big patches of hazey paint that feels a little rough to the touch. Is it possible to buff this out and return the original shine to the paint work?
     
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  3. RobbieWebs

    RobbieWebs Well-Known Member
    VCDS Map User

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    Probably, but without seeing how can we tell lol.
    Post up some pics :)
    I'd read the stickies in this section as it will tell u all u need to know about decontaminating and buffing m8 :)
     
  4. Craig Cull

    Craig Cull Well-Known Member

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    could be a few flatting marks from a previous paint job or just some form of contamination. I would give it a machine polish with either 3m fast cut or farrecla g3 or g6 rapid cut. After removing any compound left behind with a microfibre cloth I would use 3m fine compound or hologram remover with a soft pad on the machine polisher or 3m finesse. This should bring back the shine and remove any swirls. If your happy with the finish, remove ny excess with a microfibre and give it nice coat of wax :)

    if you need to know anything more pm me, I'll be happy to help.
     
  5. joe_echo

    joe_echo Member

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    20130920_124202.jpg 20130920_124224.jpg

    here is the haze I have. its abit difficult to see in the 2nd picture but in the first you can clearly see the white patches on the paint work
     
  6. Craig Cull

    Craig Cull Well-Known Member

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    Yeah I can see it. First I'd try using a clay bar and washing up liquid. Usually removes most contaminants. Failing that I would give it a wet flat with 2000 wet + dry then polish it up using the above process. If that doesn't remove it then it could be underneath or it could be solvent popping. This usually occurs when the painter applys too much lacquer with out leaving a reasonable flash off period between coats, then switches the oven to bake mode without letting the solvent evaporate, which forms a skin, then the solvent breaks through leaving little bubbles in the paint. The only way round this is to repaint I'm afraid. Its worth a shot tho.... :/
     

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