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98'-99' maintenance

Discussion in 'Detailing - Sponsored by Slim's Detailing' started by ivkat, Dec 24, 2004.

  1. ivkat

    ivkat New Member

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    Okay, so i already posted this thread in the a4/s4 forum, but wasn't sure if this was the appropriate place to post this thread, sorry, very new to the site.

    Hi, i am new to this forum and am very close to purchasing a 98' or 99' a4 1.8 t quattro. Anyway i want to get one with around 50 or 60k mi, but i have read some reviews about there being a lot of mechanical maintanence issues with the car at around 80k-100k mi. Is this true, and if it is, what are the most common problems and their expenses? (ie: should i buy this car?) thanks for the help in advance.
     
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  3. audi5e

    audi5e Member

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    always get a car with a service history, preferably from an Audi dealer if you can. trace the said dealer and ask them what problems or issues have been recorded (this should be on their database). make sure timing belt/tensioner/water pump have been done (depending on millage).
     
  4. jdp1962

    jdp1962 Grumpy Old Moderator
    Staff Member Moderator Audi S4

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    It always helps to know where you are based. In the UK, if you get the registration number of the car (license plate, if you're from the USA), you can call Audi GB Headquaters, and they can tell you the history of the car for as long as it stayed within the Audi dealer system. I'm sure it's the same in other countries.

    If you buying something around the 80,000 miles plus mark, you MUST check if the cambelt has been replaced. It's generally due around 70-75,000 miles in Audis, and is an expensive job. The trouble is that it is potentially much more expensive if an old belt fails, as it can mean a complete new engine. A totally false economy not to do it.

     

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